Mandy El-Sayegh

Mandy El-Sayegh

in conversation with Sohrab Mohebbi

November 29, 2018

On the occasion of her solo exhibition at Lehmann Maupin, MUTATIONS IN BLUE, WHITE AND RED, artist Mandy El-Sayegh will join Sohrab Mohebbi, curator, SculptureCenter, for a conversation about her practice at the gallery on Thursday, November 29, 2018. 

 

2018 Power 100 List

2018 Power 100 List

Art Review

This year's most influential people in the contemporary artworld. 

 

[주목작가 – 안젤 오테로] 오일 페인트 긁어 만든 ‘달 표면’ 기억들

[주목작가 – 안젤 오테로] 오일 페인트 긁어 만든 ‘달 표면’ 기억들

Do Ho Suh house sculpture stays put in London's square mile

Do Ho Suh house sculpture stays put in London's square mile

The Art Newspaper

Korean artist Do Ho Suh’s replica of a Korean house and surrounding bamboo garden (Bridging Home, London), installed on a footbridge at Wormwood Street in central London, will remain in situ for another 16 months. The sculptural installation, curated by the director of Draf, Fatos Ustek, will remain in place near Liverpool Street Station until March 2020 after the non-profit organisations behind the piece—Art Night and Sculpture in the City—submitted an application to extend planning permission.

Lehmann Maupin opens new gallery in Chelsea

Lehmann Maupin opens new gallery in Chelsea

amNY

At a time when many art galleries are struggling to keep their doors open in the face of a constantly changing market, Lehmann Maupin is cementing its ambitious ascent to the top of the art world with a new Chelsea flagship, a recently opened Seoul gallery, and a thriving home in Hong Kong.

What it Means When Columbia Does a Show About the Black Model on Its West Harlem Expansion Campus

What it Means When Columbia Does a Show About the Black Model on Its West Harlem Expansion Campus

Vulture

Posing Modernity: The Black Model from Manet and Matisse to Today is the current exhibition at the new Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery, part of Columbia University’s $6.3 billion expansion into West Harlem. (Columbia Corporate prefers to call the area Manhattanville.) Previously on a windowless floor of a mixed department building and now in the Lenfest Center for the Arts, a shiny new building designed by starchitect Renzo Piano, the Wallach frames its recent move as a nod to the commons: freed from the confines of an academic building, according to the press releases, it is now more boldly open to the public. Harlem’s residents, however, have been organizing for years against Columbia’s expansion, which displaced many businesses and thousands of people. At the gallery’s opening in the spring of 2017, a sign read — incorrectly — “Lenfest Center for the Art.” More money, more typos.

Despite China’s Wavering Economy, Western Dealers Find Plenty of Encouragement at Shanghai’s Art Fairs

Despite China’s Wavering Economy, Western Dealers Find Plenty of Encouragement at Shanghai’s Art Fairs

Artnet News

The art world descended on Shanghai this week as the opening of two major art fairs coincided with the launch of the Shanghai Biennial. The convergence of big events makes the city a key stop on the global art circuit for Asian galleries and international mega-galleries alike—despite fearshaunting the Chinese economy that include slowing growth, a weakening currency, a real estate bubble, high levels of debt, and a possible trade war with the US.

Here’s the Artist List for the 2018 Shanghai Biennale

Here’s the Artist List for the 2018 Shanghai Biennale

ARTnews

Just a few days ahead of its opening to the public this Saturday, the Shanghai Biennale has revealed the artist list for its 2018 edition. Curated by Cuauhtémoc Medina, chief curator of the Museo Universitario de Arte Contemporanea in Mexico City, this year’s biennial will feature 67 artists, making it a much more compact than the 2016 edition, which included more than 90 artists.

Peter Marino Creates a Layered, Art-Filled Model Unit at The Getty

Peter Marino Creates a Layered, Art-Filled Model Unit at The Getty

Architectural Digest

"I design inside/out," says AD100 architect and designer Peter Marino. This holistic approach has become a hallmark of Marino's work on projects from private residences to luxury retail flagships. It is perhaps nowhere more on display, though, than at The Getty,the luxury condominium building Marino has designed along New York's High Line. Following completion of the structure, Marino looked to the inside, lending his discerning eye to the finishes, fixtures, and floor plans of the building's five units (four full-floor residences and one triplex penthouse). And, finally, he outfitted it, appointing a model unit in the building to his own exacting standards.

그들 그림은 무엇이 다를까? 뉴욕·베이징서 온 젊은작가 2人

그들 그림은 무엇이 다를까? 뉴욕·베이징서 온 젊은작가 2人

Newsis

뉴욕과 베이징에서 온 젊은 작가 2명이 한국에서 첫 개인전을 연다. 81년, 82년생, 30대 중반의 두 작가는 성장 배경과 환경이 다르지만, 회화의 본질과 역사에 근간을 두고 작업한다는 공통점이 있다.

미술시장 불황속 이들 해외 작가 내한전은 어떤 의미가 있을까. 주요 화랑가에서 국내 젊은작가들의 개인전이 뜸한 가운데 열리는 이 전시는 현재 해외미술 시장의 트렌드를 보여주는 한편 국내 작가들의 해외 진출망도 자극한다. 

10 Booths To Visit At West Bund Art & Design

10 Booths To Visit At West Bund Art & Design

Hong Kong Tatler

Hundreds of art collectors, critics and curators are now packing for their annual trip to Shanghai, where the West Bund Art & Design fair is running from November 7—11. Featuring over 90 galleries from all corners of the world, this year's fair promises to be bigger and better than ever before.

Before West Bund Art & Design opens its doors, we reveal what 10 leading galleries will be exhibiting—and selling—at the sho

A Gallery by Any Other Name, Size and Shape?

A Gallery by Any Other Name, Size and Shape?

New York Times

Either you dig in, invest and expand or, in essence, you don’t grow.

That’s how David Kordansky described the decision to expand the gallery in Los Angeles that bears his name. By April, it is scheduled to span an entire city block in the Edgewood area below Mid-Wilshire.

Elephant

Elephant

Why Liza Lou Needs to Destroy to Create

Since moving back to California, Lou’s unusual, bead-based process acts as a way of “saying hello” to the women she worked with in a Durban township that she left behind. Words by Ariela Gittlen

What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week

What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week

The New York Times

The first New York show for the ink painter Suh Se Ok, at Lehmann Maupin, is doubly significant: not only as a belated Western discovery of a Korean trailblazer, but also as an essential step toward a more plural view of Korean abstraction.

Ambition takes root at Frieze in London

Ambition takes root at Frieze in London

Financial Times

“People gather in large tent,” proclaims British artist David Shrigley in a specially commissioned headline for The Art Newspaper, produced for this year’s Frieze fairs in London’s Regent’s Park (until Sunday). More of Shrigley’s humour can be found at Stephen Friedman’s solo booth at Frieze London, via a site-specific neon shopfront attracting Instagrammers and buyers on the fair’s first of two VIP days on October 3 (works priced between £1,800 and £50,000).

 

Artist Marilyn Minter: "Donald Trump Is A Monster"

Artist Marilyn Minter: "Donald Trump Is A Monster"

Hong Kong Tatler

When I call Marilyn Minter in her New York studio, she is not painting, taking photos or doing any of the things you might expect of an artist preparing for their first solo show in Asia. Instead, she is planning a protest.

Brooklyn Museum Acquires Fabric Recreation of Do Ho Suh’s Chelsea Apartment

Brooklyn Museum Acquires Fabric Recreation of Do Ho Suh’s Chelsea Apartment

ARTnews

Lawrence B. Benenson, a partner of the New York–based real estate investment and development company Benenson Capital Partners, has given Do Ho Suh’s 2003 installation The Perfect Home II to the Brooklyn Museum. The work will go on view on October 12 as part of “One Brooklyn,” a new exhibition series devoted to single-work presentations.

Even as Brexit Looms, Galleries Notch Sales on Frieze London’s Opening Day

Even as Brexit Looms, Galleries Notch Sales on Frieze London’s Opening Day

ARTnews

The latest iterations of Frieze London and Frieze Masters, artfully bivouacked in separate bespoke white tents at opposite ends of Regent’s Park in London, opened on Wednesday to a first tranche of VIP guests, and racked up a steady, though hardly volcanic, stream of sales.

 

Must-see works at the Gwangju Biennale: This year’s edition features artists touching on the borders that exist between everything

Must-see works at the Gwangju Biennale: This year’s edition features artists touching on the borders that exist between everything

Korea JoongAng Daily

GWANGJU - The 12th Gwangju Biennale (GB), one of the world’s major art biennials, is now in its middle phase. Under the multiple curator system introduced by Sunjung Kim, president of the Gwangju Biennale Foundation, 11 curators on seven teams have created seven exhibitions, with a total of 163 artists from 42 countries participating. The event is being held at the Gwangju Biennale Exhibition Hall, the Asia Culture Center (ACC) and other venues throughout the city.

Lehmann Maupin Opens the Doors to Its New Peter Marino–Designed Flagship

Lehmann Maupin Opens the Doors to Its New Peter Marino–Designed Flagship

Introspective

Since its founding by Rachel Lehmann and David Maupin in 1996, Lehmann Maupin has been known for championing the work of groundbreaking artists like Teresita Fernández, Do Ho Suh, Mickalene Thomas and Nari Ward. Now, the New York gallery (which also has outposts in Hong Kong and Seoul) has opened a new three-story space in Chelsea.

Finding Art in the Sky: A Conversation with Liza Lou

Finding Art in the Sky: A Conversation with Liza Lou

Modern Painters

Liza Lou’s “The Clouds” is monumental. At 23 feet high and 50 feet wide, the work is made up of thousands of glass beads that she painted and then shattered with a hammer. Surrounded by a series of sculptures and wall reliefs as well as a variety of large-scale drawings, it acts as the centerpiece of “Classification and Nomenclature of Clouds,” Lou’s latest exhibition that takes up two of Lehmann Maupin’s New York gallery spaces, including a brand new one on West 24th Street.

Healing History’s Scars in the Art of Kader Attia

Healing History’s Scars in the Art of Kader Attia

Hyperallergic

BARCELONA — Why must English be so angled? Our words are often blunt when they should be soft. Take the word “scar,” for instance. That which defines the marks left by trauma conveys in its sound the violence of wounds. The crass “S” and the hard “R” of the word are much more aggressive in English than in other languages. Take the Italian “cicatrice” or the similarly lettered Spanish, “cicatriz,” which convey (to my ear, at least) something more salutary than the English. It is an epilogue to pain rather than the main event: the scar signals healing, not the wound.

Rachel Lehmann And David Maupin Discuss New Chelsea Flagship, Their Drive For Equality In Art

Rachel Lehmann And David Maupin Discuss New Chelsea Flagship, Their Drive For Equality In Art

Forbes

Rachel Lehmann and David Maupin founded their gallery Lehmann Maupin in 1996 with a storefront in New York’s SoHo neighborhood. Since then, Lehmann Maupin has turned into a global art powerhouse with locations in New York, Hong Kong, and Seoul, showing artists like Mickalene Thomas, OSGEMEOS, McArthur Binion, Catherine Opie, Gilbert & George, Teresita Fernandez, Juergen Teller, and more. The duo recently expanded to a massive 8,500-square-foot, three-story flagship in Chelsea where a Getty Gas Station once stood, in the new Peter Marino-designed Getty building. An exhibition by Liza Lou served as the gallery’s inaugural show, featuring intricate beaded wall hangings made in part by women in South Africa. Lou would then explore the materiality of the beaded panels by smashing and destroying them to create textured patterns within the work. I quizzed Lehmann and Maupin about the strategy behind selecting the space, how they planned its design, diversity in the art world, and what’s next for the global gallery.

Harvard art exhibits remind us James Baldwin was right. The time for change is now

Harvard art exhibits remind us James Baldwin was right. The time for change is now

The Boston Globe

James Baldwin said light was in the eyes. But we’re always rushing, phone in hand, too busy to see the humanity in strangers.

Sitting on a wooden bench in “Autumn (…Nothing Personal),” a public art installation by renowned artist Teresita Fernández and inspired by Baldwin’s words, there’s no escaping at the very least a glance at one another.

The Visceral Work of Heidi Bucher, as Seen by Her Sons

The Visceral Work of Heidi Bucher, as Seen by Her Sons

Elephant

The Swiss avant-garde artist, who died twenty-five years ago, is known for her highly visceral works, casting bodies, objects and sometimes entire rooms in latex to create haunting and delicate imprints. As an extensive exhibition begins its two-month run at Parasol unit in London, her two sons, Mayo and Indigo Bucher, discuss their mother and her work via four of their favourite pieces in the show.

Liza Lou in conversation with Francine Prose

Liza Lou in conversation with Francine Prose

Monday, October 22, 2018
6-8 PM
New York Public Library, Jefferson Market Branch
425 6th Avenue, New York

On the occassion of her solo exhibition at Lehmann Maupin, Classification and Nomenclature of Clouds, artist Liza Lou​ will join writer and critic Francine Prose for a conversation on her practice at the New York Public Library, Jefferson Market Branch. This program is open to the public, however RSVPs are requested.

The Dazzling and Dooming Art of Cecilia Vicuña

The Dazzling and Dooming Art of Cecilia Vicuña

Hyperallergic

BERKELEY, Calif. — The Chilean artist Cecilia Vicuña is having her first US–based survey at the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA). But “retrospective” doesn’t ring quite right for an artist whose work disrupts linear time. And “work” doesn’t ring quite right for an aesthetic that emerges from its own dematerialization.

Traditional Korean house installed above busy London street by Do Ho Suh

Traditional Korean house installed above busy London street by Do Ho Suh

Dezeen

South Korean artist Do Ho Suh has built a replica of his childhood home and installed it above a road in the City of London.

Called Bridging Home, London, the installation sees a traditional Korean dwelling built on top of a pedestrian bridge spanning Wormwood Street, a dual carriageway located near Liverpool Street station.

Heidi Bucher review – memories are made of this

Heidi Bucher review – memories are made of this

The Guardian

Sculptor, performer and plaster caster extraordinaire, the late Swiss artist Heidi Bucher conjures the past in literal feats of reincarnation

Simmons & Simmons collaboration shows there’s no place like home

Simmons & Simmons collaboration shows there’s no place like home

The Times

Something a bit weird will appear over the footbridge above Wormwood Street near Liverpool Street station in London this coming Monday: a replica of a traditional Korean home, including a surrounding bamboo garden — and all thanks to a law firm.

TWO FROM KOREA: Suh Se Ok

TWO FROM KOREA: Suh Se Ok

Whitewall

The major South Korean brush painter, Suh Se Ok, is having his first exhibition in  New York at the age of 89. This is clearly a celebratory occasion for those impassioned by his paintings and for those who have vindicated their importance over decades of time. Suh’s work instills a cool elegance combined with a propensity to experiment with abstract forms in ways considered outside the standard practices of brush painting. In doing so, Suh captures the literati tradition at its height and in all its magnitude. His method is recognized among elite counterparts as Muninhwa, or painting in the manner of noble scholars. Suh Se Ok is a master of his craft.

Animation and Abstraction: Jennifer Steinkamp Interviewed by Sean Capone

Animation and Abstraction: Jennifer Steinkamp Interviewed by Sean Capone

BOMB

I first learned about Jennifer Steinkamp’s animated videos long before I saw one in person; but even without seeing the work in motion, I felt I understood it right away. Her style of looping, optically seductive, computer-generated imagery was already part of the visual DNA of a generation of digital artists and VJs who employed the moving image as an experiential and performative medium. Steinkamp pioneered the use of 3D animated imagery and immersive projection environments at a time when the technology wasn’t accessible to most artists … or appreciated by the art world at large. Now, of course, digital flatscreens and projections are all but ubiquitous in the urban environment, allowing video art to expand into the space beyond the gallery and museum walls. —Sean Capone

REMEMBER THE TIME

REMEMBER THE TIME

Artforum

TAXI DRIVERS IN KOREA DON’T TALK MUCH, and with the fear of confusing them even further, I’ve learned to just hand them my phone and help as they put on their reading glasses and try to zoom to my destination. While being transported around Gwangju and Seoul earlier this month, I thought of last year’s hugely popular South Korean film A Taxi Driver and Chia-En Jao’s 2016 video Taxi—but, really, the first thing you notice in those cities is that Google Maps does not work. You can search for your destination and see your position, but the App cannot provide you a route. This, upon further research, is because security restrictions bar exporting mapping data to foreign companies due to potential threats from North Korea. So you learn to trust your gut, pick a path and go—or at least use the local Naver Map instead.

Critics' Choice: Heidi Bucher

Critics' Choice: Heidi Bucher

Financial Times

She cast the interior of her childhood home 20 years before Rachel Whiteread's "House", made latex hanging works at the same time as the more famous Eva Hesse, and in 1987 created "Die Quelle" (The Source), the strange giant vase spouting cascades of latex water that now appears to float over Parasol's outdoor terrace.

2018 Aperture Gala to Honor Artists and Leaders Expanding Our Vision of Family

2018 Aperture Gala to Honor Artists and Leaders Expanding Our Vision of Family

Aperture Magazine

Aperture’s theme this fall season is photography and the family. The Aperture Gala on October 30 will celebrate five leaders and artists for their contributions to art and photography and to the power of family: the human family, the families who support us (including the families we choose), and the Aperture family of photography.

Beads and art world bigwigs abound at the opening of Lehmann Maupin’s new Chelsea gallery

Beads and art world bigwigs abound at the opening of Lehmann Maupin’s new Chelsea gallery

The Art Newspaper

In a blithely optimistic move, to counter a feeling of the other shoe dropping on the nation this autumn, the New York dealers Rachel Lehmann and David Maupin inaugurated their new, purpose-built gallery in Chelsea with an exhibition by Liza Lou, the unrivalled bead queen of art.

The Gwangju Biennale Is Overly Ambitious, Muddled, Difficult to Navigate—and, at Times, Extremely Rewarding

The Gwangju Biennale Is Overly Ambitious, Muddled, Difficult to Navigate—and, at Times, Extremely Rewarding

Artnet News

The 12th Gwangju Biennale, which opened in the South Korean city on September 7, is a multi-headed beast organized by 11 curators that encompasses seven different exhibitions. It also comes with a loaded origin story: The biennial was launched in 1995 to commemorate the pro-democratic uprising of 1980, which ended in the massacre of peaceful demonstrators by the military. In terms of scale, relevance, and engagement with collective trauma, the 12th edition of one of Asia’s oldest and best respected biennials has a lot in common with the German quinquennial documenta. The curators’ efforts to represent global multiplicities also runs the risk of repeating some of the problematic aspects of an at times confused and confusing documenta 14.

Liza Lou’s Exploration of Clouds Opens Lehmann Maupin Space

Liza Lou’s Exploration of Clouds Opens Lehmann Maupin Space

WWD

Artist Liza Lou didn’t have to look far to find the inspiration for her latest solo show, “Classification and Nomenclature of Clouds.” “I noticed I was always looking up,” says Lou. “And sometimes when you have an obsession, you think it’s not related to your work; it’s just something you’re really interested in. So I didn’t think, oh, this is my next project.”

‘My Whole Life Has Been Following This Single Material’: How Liza Lou’s Obsession With Beads Transformed a Village in South Africa

‘My Whole Life Has Been Following This Single Material’: How Liza Lou’s Obsession With Beads Transformed a Village in South Africa

Artnet News

For three years, artisans in Durban, South Africa, have been stitching together the 600 beaded-cloth layers that make up the centerpiece of Liza Lou’s new exhibition in New York, the 100-foot-long canvas work The Clouds. The piece, which debuted at the 21st Biennale of Sydney, is on view at Lehmann Maupin gallery’s new Chelsea flagship on West 24th Street. But it’s only part of the new show, “Liza Lou: Classification and Nomenclature of Clouds,” which is the artist’s first solo exhibition in New York in 10 years and stretches into the gallery’s West 22nd Street location as well.

Dream weaver: artist Liza Lou on the teamwork behind her beadwork

Dream weaver: artist Liza Lou on the teamwork behind her beadwork

Wallpaper

In the blue, even expanse above Los Angeles, clouds are rare – yet they have been a recent preoccupation for local artist Liza Lou. ‘If you’re someone who watches clouds, they happen here more often than you think,’ she says. They are the subject of her new solo exhibition, ‘The Classification and Nomenclature of Clouds’, inaugurating Lehmann Maupin’s second New York gallery on 6 September. The main event is TheClouds, 2015-18, a painting that, like Les Nuages from Monet’s Water Lilies series, is a monumental triptych that immerses the viewer in delicate tufts of colour.

ARTIST LIZA LOU BREAKS GROUND AT LEHMANN MAUPIN’S NEW CHELSEA LOCATION

ARTIST LIZA LOU BREAKS GROUND AT LEHMANN MAUPIN’S NEW CHELSEA LOCATION

Cultured

We rely on artists to take big risks, think instinctually and follow their creative muses on our behalf—otherwise, what’s the point? If their work feels like it’s too much part of a career plan, it’s a bit too close to home for the viewer, who probably has one of her own to worry about. You can’t accuse Liza Lou of looking too much before she leaps. At age 19, she chose to work in glass before it became clear that it was, as she puts it, “the slowest possible way to make an impact artistically.” At 35, she moved to Durban, South Africa, to make art with the assistance of local Zulu makers—not exactly on a whim, but impulsively for sure. And she ended up living there for a decade.

What Happens When an Exhibition Has 11 Curators? Here’s a First Look at the Gwangju Biennale, Asia’s Largest Contemporary Art Biennial

What Happens When an Exhibition Has 11 Curators? Here’s a First Look at the Gwangju Biennale, Asia’s Largest Contemporary Art Biennial

Artnet News

The 12th edition of the Gwangju Biennale, billed as Asia’s largest and most prestigious contemporary art biennial, opened in South Korea on September 7 under the title “Imagined Borders.” However, this title is in fact more of an overarching theme uniting a cluster of seven exhibitions, each curated by one or more of the total of 11 curators involved. Each one could merit a lengthy review of its own.

Peter Marino designs Lehmann Maupin’s new Chelsea gallery in New York

Peter Marino designs Lehmann Maupin’s new Chelsea gallery in New York

Wallpaper

With almost every inch of New York’s West Chelsea neighbourhood now claimed, an exciting new residentialbuilding has sprouted up where the iconic Getty gas station once stood. Designed by Peter Marino, The Getty is comprised of six apartments – five full floor units and a single duplex penthouse with a roof terrace and private pool – and houses the Hill Art Foundation and the latest outpost of the Lehmann Maupin art gallery on the first four floors

Goings On About Town: Liza Lou

Goings On About Town: Liza Lou

The New Yorker

Before craft gained indie cred—in a time without “makers” or Etsy—this American sculptor was beading her heart out. Lou established herself, in 1996, with a painstakingly lifelike and life-sized rendition of a lived-in kitchen (a pie in the oven, dirty dishes in the sink), which took millions of glass beads and five years to create. Two decades and one MacArthur Fellowship later, she makes her début with the gallery, at its new Tenth Avenue flagship. The subject is clouds—grids of them, which hang on the walls and function as gestural abstractions. (Paint and shattered beads are involved, to atmospheric effect.) The largest of these, originally shown at the Sydney Biennale, spans fifty feet. It’s impressive. Alas, smaller works here can suggest wan takes on Monet. Lou’s head may be in the clouds, but her feminist perspective on labor persists. For more than a decade, she has collaborated with a female collective of Zulu artisans in Durban, South Africa, a fair-trade twist on the centuries-long tradition of artists’ workshops.

 

It’s a ‘Leaser’s Market’ With ‘Unheard-Of’ Rents: Why Blue-Chip Galleries Are Doubling Down in New York’s Chelsea

It’s a ‘Leaser’s Market’ With ‘Unheard-Of’ Rents: Why Blue-Chip Galleries Are Doubling Down in New York’s Chelsea

Artnet News

Veteran art dealer Rachel Lehmann had something of an epiphany a few years ago when a curator visiting from Chicago apologized profusely for not having made it to the Chelsea gallery’s Lower East Side outpost during his visit. “He was here for two days and there was so much to see in Chelsea,” recalls Lehmann. The takeaway? “Being less accessible in terms of location just adds another layer of complication. That’s another battle we didn’t want to fight. The critical mass is in Chelsea,” she says. 

Lehmann Maupin’s New Peter Marino–Designed Gallery Opens in Manhattan

Lehmann Maupin’s New Peter Marino–Designed Gallery Opens in Manhattan

Architectural Digest

Two days before its official opening, Lehmann Maupin’s Chelsea gallery is already teeming with visitors. Artists, employees, and friends are either prepping the space for the onslaught of attention soon to follow or admiring the newly installed works, which play with light and shadow on the ivory walls. One visitor is Liza Lou, the L.A.-based artist who works primarily with glass and beads and whose solo show will open the gallery later in the week. With a quiet confidence, Lou walks among her intricate creations lining the double-height space, her eyes bright.

CRASHING: LEE BUL

CRASHING: LEE BUL

Art Asia Pacific

SEP/OCT 2018

A work catching fire and forcing the cancellation of a preview would seem an inauspicious start to any exhibition. The ignition of Lee Bul’s Majestic Splendor (1991–2018), caused by the volatile potassium-permanganate agent meant to preserve the installation’s sequin-covered fish, however, gave the artist’s midcareer survey at the Hayward Gallery a mythic quality. The mishap was a reminder that exhibitions are not static displays, but living, breathing parts of culture, prone to accidents, riots and mysteries. This dynamism was embodied throughout “Crashing”—a culture in itself, curated with an idiosyncratic geography in mind. 

 

Liza Lou: The Classification And Nomenclature Of Clouds Opens Tomorrow At Lehmann Maupin Gallery

Liza Lou: The Classification And Nomenclature Of Clouds Opens Tomorrow At Lehmann Maupin Gallery

Forbes

American artist, Liza Lou is holding her first solo show in more than 10 years as the inaugural show of Lehmann Maupin's new gallery location in the Chelsea district of New York City. Her show entitled, Liza Lou: The Classification and Nomenclature of Clouds will consist of her recent bodies of work that she has produced over the last three years, including The Clouds which was exhibited at the 21st Biennale of Sydney. Additionally, she will be presenting her drawings, one of which took a whopping eleven years to complete.

Cate Blanchett, Interpreted: 9 Female Artists and Photographers Expose the Actress's Power as a Muse in a Special Issue of W Magazine

Cate Blanchett, Interpreted: 9 Female Artists and Photographers Expose the Actress's Power as a Muse in a Special Issue of W Magazine

W Magazine

At the Cannes Film Festival this year, 82 women, all of whom have starred in, directed, written, or otherwise worked on movies, including many that have been shown over the festival’s 72-year history, were celebrated together on the long red carpet that leads to the Grand Théâtre Lumière. It was a beautiful and profound statement that spoke directly to the #MeToo movement. Instead of commiserating about injustice, these women, from different backgrounds and countries, were proudly displaying their talent, range, and creativity. 

TERESITA FERNÁNDEZ ANSWERS OUR QUESTIONS ABOUT HER LATEST PUBLIC INSTALLATION

TERESITA FERNÁNDEZ ANSWERS OUR QUESTIONS ABOUT HER LATEST PUBLIC INSTALLATION

Cultured

What makes this project stand out to you from other projects you’ve done? Autumn (…Nothing Personal) is a site-specific sculpture sited in Tercentenary Theatre on the Harvard campus. It consists of thousands of transparent plastic tubes covered in thin pinstripes of burnt orange and yellow hues. I’ve made other works that have that optical, glowing cinematic quality, but this one very deliberately employs the autumn light in both a conceptual and optical way.

LIZA LOU with Charlie Schultz

LIZA LOU with Charlie Schultz

The Brooklyn Rail

It’s been ten years since Liza Lou has had a solo exhibition in New York, and more than twenty years since the daring curator, Marcia Tucker, brought Lou’s mind boggling beaded sculpture, TheKitchen (1991 – 1996), to the New Museum and effectively introduced the artist to the art world. Since then Lou has established and maintained a studio in Durban, South Africa, where she works alongside a dedicated team to create beaded sculptures—and now paintings—that have become increasingly less figurative over time. The title of her exhibition, The Classification and Nomenclature of Clouds, draws upon an essay from 1802 by Luke Howard, a chemist and amateur meteorologist, wherein the author gives clouds the names we still use today. The centerpiece of this exhibition is a mesmerizing installation called The Clouds (2015 – 2018) that covers the largest wall in Lehman Maupin’s new gallery, which this show inaugurates. Rail Managing Editor, Charles Schultz, spoke with Lou via Skype the day after she finished packing and crating up the work in her Los Angeles studio.

Tony Oursler: TC: the most interesting man alive

Tony Oursler: TC: the most interesting man alive

The Brooklyn Rail

Tony Oursler’s film TC: the most interesting man alive (2016 – 2018), made with avant-garde polymath and long-time collaborator Tony Conrad (1940 – 2016), portrays Conrad as an interview subject in Oursler’s studio. Known for working beyond the established boundaries of their respective mediums, Oursler and Conrad rejected a conventional interview structure in which the subject is demystified through the divulgence of information, and instead produced an alchemical potion of untrustworthy narration, humor, music, and theatrics.

Material Strength

Material Strength

Wall Street Journal

Artist Liza Lou’s first New York show in a decade inaugurates Lehmann Maupin’s new outpost.

Mickalene Thomas: I Can't See You Without Me

Mickalene Thomas: I Can't See You Without Me

Artforum

September 2018

The muse is the métier for Mickalene Thomas, the odalisque her great subject. Thomas's paintings depicting her late mother, Sandra, or her lovers like Maya an Racquel, spin her relations into dazzling reflections on how we look and touch, who we see, what we desire. Rhinestones and glitter and flock and enamel tessellate into marvelous figures; somehow the facture does not look broken, but like a coming together. Thomas's is a project of schooling art history in the terms of endearment. Her latest museum exhibition, "I Can't See You Without Me." will feature more than thirty works of painting, video, and installation, and is accompanied by a catalogue with contributions by the show's cocurator, Michael Goodson, as well as Beverly Guy-Sheftall, Nicole Fleetwood, and Antwaun Sargent. 

Artist Mickalene Thomas: ‘It was always a political statement'

Artist Mickalene Thomas: ‘It was always a political statement'

Financial Times

Mickalene Thomas sets her tea down on the kitchen table and saunters to the back of her airy Brooklyn studio, where her latest work practically explodes from the wall. In the kinetic mash-up of paint, silk screen, photography and drawing, a sleek woman with skin the colour of latte stretches seductively across the 12ft-wide canvas, her back slightly arched, her clingy black-and-white dress revealing plenty of leg.  

An Interview with Artist Liza Lou

An Interview with Artist Liza Lou

Town&Country

When Liza Lou’s new exhibition, Classification and Nomenclature of Clouds, opens on September 6, it won’t just mark the artist’s first New York solo show in more than 10 years, but will also serve as the inaugural exhibition at the new, Peter Marino-designed outpost of her gallery, Lehmann Maupin. The exhibition will feature a new series of Lou’s sculptures as well as a 100-foot-long, site-specific installation, all boasting the woven glass beads for which the MacArthur Grant winning artist has become known. “It’s been a body of work that’s been all about asking questions about what’s possible in terms of art material,” Lou says. “What are the boundaries between painting and sculpture?”

From Joan Mitchell’s Early Works to Daniel Arsham’s Dystopian Future: 45 Can’t-Miss Gallery Shows in New York This September

From Joan Mitchell’s Early Works to Daniel Arsham’s Dystopian Future: 45 Can’t-Miss Gallery Shows in New York This September

Artnet News

“Liza Lou: Classification and Nomenclature of Clouds” at Lehmann Maupin. Liza Lou hasn’t had a New York solo show in over a decade, but she’s inaugurating Lehmann Maupin‘s new Chelsea flagship with her monumental fabric and beadwork painting The Clouds, which appeared at the Sydney Biennale. The work’s 600 pieces were hand sewn in a gridded pattern with assistance from her studio of women in Durban, South Africa. Lou then paints over the beads, before breaking some of the beads to reveal the stencil-like surface below. She’ll also take over the gallery’s 536 West 22nd Street space with paintings and sculptures from her “Terra” series.

JENNIFER STEINKAMP

JENNIFER STEINKAMP

Artforum

The Los Angeles-based artist Jennifer Steinkamp’s Blind Eye, 1, 2018, a roughly three-minute-long animated loop, depicts a life-size grove of birch trees cycling through the seasons, their ocular scars delivering an uncanny, plural gaze. The video is included in a survey of the artist’s work at the Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts, titled “Blind Eye,” which comprises the first video installations shown at the museum and is on view through October 8, 2018. Here, Steinkamp talks about inspirations for “Blind Eye,” the limitations of vision, and learning to decide.

Take a Look Inside Lehmann Maupin’s New Peter Marino–Designed Gallery

Take a Look Inside Lehmann Maupin’s New Peter Marino–Designed Gallery

Galerie

For two decades, Lehmann Maupin has championed some of contemporary art’s most beloved luminaries, such as Do Ho Suh, Juergen Teller, and Mickalene Thomas. Founded by Rachel Lehmann and David Maupin in 1996, the gallery has had multiple homes around New York, as well as one in Hong Kong and another in Seoul to match its growing profile. Now it occupies the former site of the Getty—gas station, that is—which was an indelible landmark in New York’s Chelsea neighborhood. As of early September, Lehmann Maupin’s space is in a mixed-use residential building developed by the Victor Group, fittingly dubbed the Getty.

‘Jennifer Steinkamp: Blind Eye’ Review: Exploring the Digital Landscape

‘Jennifer Steinkamp: Blind Eye’ Review: Exploring the Digital Landscape

The Wall Street Journal

About a dozen years ago, I unexpectedly encountered one of Jennifer Steinkamp’s mysterious, mutable, computer-generated works, a cascade of swaying, frankly fake blossoms on delicate vines, newly installed by the entrance of an elegant restaurant near where I live. (Ever since, it has made waiting for a table a pleasure.) Titled “Rapunzel,” the moving projected tangle was at once beautiful and vaguely discomfiting; alluring because of its constant, unpredictable movement and color shifts, but also puzzling. The title triggered associations with the tales of the Brothers Grimm, which terrified me as a child, adding to the ambiguity. I’d seen other Steinkamps before, mainly trees responding to the passing seasons, but “Rapunzel” seemed especially surprising and enigmatic.

Art Shows to Leave the House for this Month

Art Shows to Leave the House for this Month

Dazed

Currently on at The Photographers’ Gallery is a major new exhibition of Alex Prager – the first-mid career survey of the American photographer and filmmaker. The show spans two floors and including over 40 photographs, as well as her notable large-scale Technicolour images and her entire film oeuvre.

Editors’ Picks: 17 Things Not to Miss in New York’s Art World This Week

Editors’ Picks: 17 Things Not to Miss in New York’s Art World This Week

Artnet News

South African artist Nicholas Hlobo’s work is about issues of identity, using materials such as leather and ribbon to suggest a contrast between the masculine and the feminine.

Cecilia Vicuña's Spatial Poems to Female Resilience

Cecilia Vicuña's Spatial Poems to Female Resilience

Frieze

You enter Cecilia Vicuña’s exhibition at Lehmann Maupin, ‘La India Contaminada’ (The Contaminated Indigenous Woman), as if stepping into a forest. Many of the 70-year old artist’s hallmark, enveloping skeins of soft wool, or quipus, hang in a thicket from the ceiling of the front gallery. In Vicuña’s native Chile, as well as Peru and Colombia, quipus – usually masses of knotted or braided rope – are used by indigenous Quechua people in the absence of a written alphabet.

Cecilia Vicuña's Spatial Poems to Female Resilience

Cecilia Vicuña's Spatial Poems to Female Resilience

Frieze

At Lehmann Maupin gallery, New York, the artist's immersive installation and paintings from the 1970s commemorate forgotten indigenous histories

Eclectic Installations

Eclectic Installations

Aesthetica Magazine

In 1997, MoMA, New York, was forced to remove an installation by Lee Bul (b. 1962) from the Projects series because of the intense odour that it gave off. Majestic Splendor (1991-1997) saw a rotting fish embroidered with sequins, in one of the South Korean artist’s eclectic determination to address notions of beauty, the role of femininity and its value.

MARY CORSE: A Survey in Light

MARY CORSE: A Survey in Light

The Brooklyn Rail

At the entrance to Mary Corse: A Survey in Light at the Whitney Museum of American Art, a monitor plays White Light (1968), a film showing a young Mary Corse at work in her studio. In one scene, Corse holds a square of fluorescent tubing, moving it playfully in front of the camera. The square begins to glow, seemingly from within, without any apparent wires or electrical source. This scene encapsulates Corse’s “light painting” practice, developed in the 1960s during the postwar technology boom in Southern California. Corse’s work has been aligned with several strains of postwar abstract art, including Minimalism and Light and Space.

Lee Bul On The Inspiration Behind Her Futuristic Show At The Hayward Gallery

Lee Bul On The Inspiration Behind Her Futuristic Show At The Hayward Gallery

Google Arts & Culture

Appearing on the art scene first in the 1980s, South Korean artist Lee Bul has recently transformed Hayward Gallery with her new dream-like exhibition, featuring monstrous bodies, futuristic cyborgs, surreal mirrored environments and a monumental foil Zeppelin. Her show brings together more than 100 of her works from the late 1980s to the present day. We talk to her about her exhibition: ...

The monstrous bodies of Lee Bul

The monstrous bodies of Lee Bul

Apollo Magazine

In an essay called ‘Beauty and Trauma’ (2000), Lee Bul tells a story from her childhood in South Korea. She was standing at a pedestrian crossing, waiting for the lights to change; as she stood there, she gazed across the road at a beautiful bakery, and its ‘sumptuously decorated cakes’ – almost a work of art. A scooter drifted into the scene, across Lee’s path, carrying a gorgeous young couple who seemed to have come from some ‘radiant, ethereal dimension’. They glided through the red light, into oncoming traffic, and then, in a heartbeat, Lee was staring at the aftermath. Their blood and flesh was spattered all over the road; the woman was thrown into the bakery window, ‘toppling over the cakes, landing face down in the vast heap of sweet, creamy confection now spattered with her blood’.

Liza Lou to Open Lehmann Maupin’s New Chelsea Gallery on September 6

Liza Lou to Open Lehmann Maupin’s New Chelsea Gallery on September 6

Lehmann Maupin is pleased to announce Liza Lou: The Classification and Nomenclature of Clouds as the inaugural exhibition of the gallery’s new, additional location at West 24th Street and Tenth Avenue. Lou will present a series of recent bodies of work produced over the last three years, including her monumental The Clouds (2015-18), recently exhibited at the 21st Biennale of Sydney. The gallery will host an opening reception for the artist on Thursday, September 6, from 6 to 8 PM, at 501 West 24th Street.

In Conversation: Marilyn Minter

In Conversation: Marilyn Minter

Asia Society, Hong Kong

August 29, 2018 | 6:30-8 PM

On the occasion of her solo exhibition at Lehmann Maupin, Hong Kong, Marilyn Minter will give a lecture on her practice on August 29. This program is organized by Asia Society Hong Kong as part of their Women of Impact Series. 

Tickets will be available at asiasociety.org/hong-kong on Tuesday, August 7th, 2018.

Catherine Opie: So long as they are wild

Catherine Opie: So long as they are wild

ArtAsiaPacific

In May this year, Catherine Opie launched her first solo exhibition at Lehmann Maupin’s Hong Kong space. Compared to the subversive portraits exploring American identities and communities that the Los Angeles-based photographer is generally known for, “So Long As They Are Wild” may appear to be surprisingly apolitical. But two-and-a-half decades after Self-Portrait/Cutting (1993)—featuring a childlike picture of two women holding hands in front of a house, crudely carved into Opie’s back—poignantly articulating the pain of living in America at the time as a lesbian woman, she is now married to her long-term partner Julie Burleigh, with children and grandchildren of their own. The artist has more than earned the right to depart from her radical social commentary work. 

The Art of Staying Cool: 10 Can't-Miss Summer Shows in New York

The Art of Staying Cool: 10 Can't-Miss Summer Shows in New York

The New York Times

“Do you want to make history?” Tim Rollins would ask students in the South Bronx public school where he started teaching in 1981. That pedagogical dialogue eventually resulted in the collective Tim Rollins & K.O.S. (Kids of Survival), which gained a level of fame in the New York art world in the ’80s and ’90s. In this small but evocative show at the Bronx Museum of the Arts, which is dedicated to Mr. Rollins, who died last year, Tim Rollins & K.O.S. is paired with Glenn Ligon, another artist who has mined history to make art.

Making the Transformative Power of Words Concrete

Making the Transformative Power of Words Concrete

Hyperallergic

There is something utterly majestic about block letters — even more so at a staggering height of 12 feet. Such is the case of the letters ‘IM’ in the painting “Invisible Man (after Ralph Ellison)” (2008) by Tim Rollins & K.O.S. With its canvas left unstretched, resembling a colossal banner, it is hard not to feel the assertiveness of its message: to be unequivocally present.

The Threat of Being Seen

The Threat of Being Seen

Aperture Magazine

Prager is known for photographing psychological, hypervivid, theatrically constructed scenes that evoke stills from classic Hollywood films, as evident in her new monograph Silver Lake Drive (2018). Cinematic and filmic are adjectives frequently applied to Prager’s photographs, but for Prager that means more than a purely aesthetic quality.

Ten public art works to see for free around New York this summer

Ten public art works to see for free around New York this summer

The Art Newspaper

When the sun’s out, get your buns—and other extremities—out to catch some of these projects across the city

Lee Bul at Hayward Gallery, London

Lee Bul at Hayward Gallery, London

ArtReview

Feminist science-fiction has long played on the idea that women are liberated when humans are confronted with other intelligences. Gender – not to mention ethnicity and class – is constructed differently when the field of relations encompasses monsters, cyborgs, artificial intelligences and animals. The coalitions between those minorities that are a feature of the genre entail remodelled social formations and alternative modes of communication – hybrid languages and new codes of behaviour – that challenge the dominant (meaning white, patriarchal, monolithic) culture. Neologism, hybridity and untranslatability are in these speculative futures symptoms of progress.

Cecilia Vicuña

Cecilia Vicuña

The New Yorker

“Language is migrant,” the Chilean artist, activist, and poet Cecilia Vicuña has written. Sound travels, too. You hear Vicuña’s fibre-and-video installation “Disappeared Quipu” before you see it, in the Great Hall of the Brooklyn Museum. Quipus are cords, knotted to record information—a system devised by the Inca, which the Spanish banned in 1583. In Vicuña’s piece, twenty-five-foot lengths of pale unspun wool hang from the ceiling, reviving the lost language while enlarging the form, just as mourning can magnify memory. Video footage of ancient textiles is projected onto the wool, accompanied by a soundtrack of Vicuña’s voice, inscrutable murmurs and the occasional shout in a secret, perhaps sacred, tongue. A compact retrospective of her four-decade career, at the Lehmann Maupin gallery (through July 6), invites visitors to walk through the more colorful “Quipu Viscera” (the museum’s sombre version is cordoned off) and includes some irresistible paintings—like the white leopard whose spots are yellow eyes—made in the nineteen-seventies in a style of realism at once magic and social.— Andrea K. Scott

So Long as They are Wild: Catherine Opie

So Long as They are Wild: Catherine Opie

ArtAsiaPacific

In May this year, Catherine Opie launched her first solo exhibition at Lehmann Maupin’s Hong Kong space. Compared to the subversive portraits exploring American identities and communities that the Los Angeles-based photographer is generally known for, “So Long As They Are Wild” may appear to be surprisingly apolitical. But two-and-a-half decades after Self-Portrait/Cutting (1993)—featuring a childlike picture of two women holding hands in front of a house, crudely carved into Opie’s back—poignantly articulating the pain of living in America at the time as a lesbian woman, she is now married to her long-term partner Julie Burleigh, with children and grandchildren of their own. The artist has more than earned the right to depart from her radical social commentary work. 

Alex Prager's Vision is an Unsettling Retelling of the American Dream

Alex Prager's Vision is an Unsettling Retelling of the American Dream

Sleek

“Everything around me is a potential ingredient”, says LA-based photographer and filmmaker Alex Prager about where she finds the ideas for her trademark stylised compositions. Considering that Prager is best known for her highly saturated and staged images of emotional, lipsticked females that riff on Hitchcock heroines, her work’s rooting in the everyday is somewhat surprising. “Real life characters and experiences always spark some sort of seed, even a characteristic, or the outfit a person wears is a thread to a larger narrative that I can build on. I don’t go out and seek these ideas — they float around in my world.” On closer inspection, however, Prager’s attention to the particulars of her day-to-day environment is what lends her imagery its uniquely uncanny quality. Drawing on multiple references — most notably canonical American photographers William Eggleston (“After leaving an Eggleston exhibition at The Getty, over 10 years ago, I bought his book and that very same day decided to be a photographer”), Diane Arbus and Cindy Sherman, as well as Hollywood cinema — Prager’s photographs and films prompt an uneasy sensation that you’ve seen this before. Perhaps, it was at the movies, or glimpsed on a billboard somewhere, or even reminiscent of someone you once saw, her images appear to reenact moments of cinematic and cultural history, but with a strange and compelling magic all of their own.

Top Hong Kong Art Shows this Week

Top Hong Kong Art Shows this Week

Blouin Artinfo

The Los Angeles-based artist Catherine Opie’s debut solo in Hong Kong combines a recent series of photographs and a series of ceramic sculptures of tree stumps. The photographs were shot in Yosemite National Park in California, evoking the works of the photographer Ansel Adams, but Opie distorts the landscape cliches with odd compositions and angles that challenge photographic orthodoxy.   Opie’s new ceramic sculptures of tree stumps address similar concerns about human perceptions of the natural world. Made from clay, these are the first sculptures the artist has created as tactical representations of the nature in her photographs.

Silver Lake Drive: Photographing the Sinister Side of Hollywood

Silver Lake Drive: Photographing the Sinister Side of Hollywood

Refinery29

Alex Prager is wondering whether to wash her hair. The American photographer and filmmaker and Refinery29 are waiting for the lift as she explains the toll a month of London pollution has taken on her locks. Surrounding us, is the reason she’s been in town: Silver Lake Drive, a stunning new exhibition that celebrates a decade of Prager’s cinematic lens.
 

Silver Lake Drive: Alex Prager unveils her latest exhibition.

Silver Lake Drive: Alex Prager unveils her latest exhibition.

Wonderland

Launching last week at The Photographers’ Gallery, LA-based photographer and filmmaker Alex Prager brings her iconic photographs to the masses. Looking through her decade long career, the exhibition sees her celebrated Crowd series amongst the collection of 40 photographs as will as her entire filmic oeuvre.

Alex Prager's Mid-Career Survey at The Photographers' Gallery​

Alex Prager's Mid-Career Survey at The Photographers' Gallery​

Widewalls

An American photographer and filmmaker, Alex Prager is known for film-like images of staged sets and models that reference a range of themes, from the history of Hollywood and photography to the cinematic image in art contexts. Exaggerated and costumed, her subjects speak to the ambiguity of seduction and spectacle.

Alex Prager: Silver Lake Drive review

Alex Prager: Silver Lake Drive review

Time Out London

You get an eerie sense of déjà vu in this show of American artist Alex Prager’s photography. Seeing the drunken parties, suspicious faces and elaborate beach scenes she meticulously stages, you’re certain that each scenario is familiar – is it a classic American film you’ve seen a thousand times but can’t quite remember? Is it an old 1970s Coke ad? A vintage sitcom?

71 Large-Scale Projects In Unlimited At Art Basel In Basel 2018

71 Large-Scale Projects In Unlimited At Art Basel In Basel 2018

MNI Alive

Unlimited, Art Basel's unique platform for large-scale projects, provides galleries with the opportunity to showcase installations, monumental sculptures, video projections, wall paintings, photographic series and performance art that transcend the traditional art-fair stand.

Mary Corse and Dorothea Rockburne get their due at Dia: Beacon

Mary Corse and Dorothea Rockburne get their due at Dia: Beacon

The Art Newspaper

“What was wrong with people back then?” the artist Joan Jonas said. “Couldn’t anyone see?” The multimedia pioneer was at Dia: Beacon and talking about 1968, the date on a transfixing, white-light sculpture by Mary Corse. How had such a radiant work stayed under the art world radar for so long?

Exploring Hollywood’s Sinister Underbelly, with Artist Alex Prager

Exploring Hollywood’s Sinister Underbelly, with Artist Alex Prager

AnOther

California’s palm-lined streets, intense sunshine and abundant blue skies are embedded in our cultural consciousness. The city is the epitome of the American dream, imbued with cinematic characteristics and symbolising the promise of perfection. It attracts those seeking reinvention, or who simply desire to become something they are not – but buried just beneath this fantasy lies a potent sense of unease and existential dread.

The Big Picture: Alex Prager’s Preflight Pawns

The Big Picture: Alex Prager’s Preflight Pawns

The Guardian

Technically a photograph, this is actually a still from a nonexistent film. Alex Prager – who has a show later this month at the Photographers’ Gallery in London, plus a lavish retrospective book, Silver Lake Drive – does not snatch momentary excerpts from life. Instead the American photographer assembles a cast of characters, directorially positions them, and instructs them to enact private dramas derived from a script she writes in advance.

After Dansaekhwa: South Korea’s new generation of artists

After Dansaekhwa: South Korea’s new generation of artists

Christie's

In November 2015, Christie’s held its first group exhibition of work by South Korean artists, Forming Nature, which opened in New York before travelling to Hong Kong, and showcased works by figures associated with the Dansaekhwa movement.

Innovative Light and Space Artist Mary Corse Is Finally Getting the Exhibitions She Deserves

Innovative Light and Space Artist Mary Corse Is Finally Getting the Exhibitions She Deserves

Artsy

Mary Corse's artwork shimmers, flickers, and ultimately dazzles the viewer as it reflects, refracts, and generates light. It’s notoriously difficult to reproduce in photographs, requiring a shifting, appraising body to complete its unique brand of magic.

Lee Bul at Hayward Gallery, London

Lee Bul at Hayward Gallery, London

ArtReview

Feminist science-fiction has long played on the idea that women are liberated when humans are confronted with other intelligences. Gender – not to mention ethnicity and class – is constructed differently when the field of relations encompasses monsters, cyborgs, artificial intelligences and animals. The coalitions between those minorities that are a feature of the genre entail remodelled social formations and alternative modes of communication – hybrid languages and new codes of behaviour – that challenge the dominant (meaning white, patriarchal, monolithic) culture. Neologism, hybridity and untranslatability are in these speculative futures symptoms of progress.

The Californian Artist Posing Questions of Light and Space

The Californian Artist Posing Questions of Light and Space

AnOther

With a recent gallery installation at Dia:Beacon and an upcoming solo show at the Whitney in New York, Mary Corse is having a significant, well-earned moment of recognition. Working as a dedicated artist since the 1960s, she is one of few women connected to California’s west coast Light and Space movement. Directionally, though, her artistic focus contrasted with her Light and Space peers. “I’m not a landscape artist, the literal aspects of the environment don’t influence me,” says Corse. “I’m not influenced by the outside world at all, really. I would paint the same in New York as California. It’s an internal impulse to paint the way that I do.” Corse’s art explores the question of perception through painting – specifically, finding light within painting. In her visionary work, light is both subject and medium, where seeing is a wholly subjective experience.

Please Touch the Art

Please Touch the Art

Harvard Political Review

 

An inquisitive child impulsively reaches toward a piece of artwork that has captured her imagination. Arms stretched out, she leans toward the gilded frame, anticipating touching the sinuous lines on the canvas created by the oil paints of an Impressionist artist. “Stop!” an anxious security guard shouts. The child turns away, as her hope of fully experiencing the art that has mesmerized her disappears. Met with commands of “Don’t touch the art!” from both the security guard and a parent surprised to find that their child has nearly gotten them removed from the museum, the child can only stare at the piece from a distance. Although she is free to admire the piece, she can neither fully interact with it nor fully immerse herself in it.

9 Art Events to Attend in New York City This Week

9 Art Events to Attend in New York City This Week

ARTnews

Exhibition: Mary Corse at Whitney Museum
Mary Corse was one of only a handful of women to emerge as part of the mid-1960s Light and Space movement, and her Whitney show will be her first-ever institutional survey. Unlike many of her West Coast peers, among them Larry Bell and Robert Irwin, Corse has explored matters of light through abstract painting and other means. A selection of her 1960s “White Light” works—which include glass particles fused with white paint—will be included here alongside works that incorporate fluorescent tubes.
Whitney Museum, 99 Gansevoort Street, 10:30 a.m.–10 p.m.

Sculpture and non-sculpture: London galleries showcase Korean art

Sculpture and non-sculpture: London galleries showcase Korean art

Financial Times

While the world focuses this week on Korean geopolitics, two London galleries have turned the spotlight on Korean art. At the Hayward Gallery, a beguiling mid-career survey of work by Lee Bul presents us with a fractured world where seductive surface glitter masks something darker beneath, while at White Cube, a smaller but no less impressive show gives a taste of the poetic inventiveness of Seung-Taek Lee. Now 54, Lee Bul emerged as an artist in the late 1980s. South Korea was moving from dictatorship to democracy — and the contemporary art scene was poised to go global. A sculpture graduate from the elite Hongik University, Lee Bul nonetheless launched into performance art: padding out her body, she stalked the streets of Seoul as a strange, lumpy creature questioning notions of female beauty. Seung-Taek Lee, 86, grew up in what is now North Korea.

Lee Bul: Crashing review – beauty with menace

Lee Bul: Crashing review – beauty with menace

The Guardian

The Korean president lies dead in a block of ice. Or not quite dead, perhaps, for his sunglasses still glint with vitality in the depths of the transparent resin. Through a fissure near his head, skeins of black sequins spurt like blood, gathering in bright pools on the floor. The sculpture is deeply sinister and yet somehow pretty; although its title, Thaw, is a clincher. At any moment the ice could melt and President Park Chung-hee might come back to life in all his brutality.

Quantum leap for Mary Corse as clutch of shows brings overdue recognition​

Quantum leap for Mary Corse as clutch of shows brings overdue recognition​

The Art Newspaper

At the age of 72, Mary Corse will have her first solo museum exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art next month. A group of her pioneering abstract paintings has also recently been acquired by the Dia Art Foundation. Now recognised as sharing affinities with works by artists in the California Light and Space movement, including James Turrell and Robert Irwin, Corse’s works will go on view this weekend (6 May) at Dia:Beacon alongside those of her better-known peers working contemporaneously in the 1960s and 1970s.

Ari Emanuel, Scarlett Johansson Scout Frieze New York

Ari Emanuel, Scarlett Johansson Scout Frieze New York

The Hollywood Reporter

The Endeavor-owned art fair's early 2019 L.A. debut was a hot topic among collectors and gallery owners at the event, where John Krasinski and David Byrne also checked out the wares.

Tim Rollins remembered at moving NY tribute event​

Tim Rollins remembered at moving NY tribute event​

The Art Newspaper

Tributes were paid earlier this week to a titan of the art world when friends and fans of the late activist and educator Tim Rollins gathered for a celebration of his life and achievements at the SVA Theatre in Chelsea, New York. Rollins died last December; his work with students in the South Bronx in the early 1980s prompted him to found the collective K.O.S. (Kids of Survival) which he continued to lead for more than three decades. K.O.S. member Angel Abreu led the tributes, saying that “it was all representative of Tim’s indelible mark on me, the rest of KOS and the countless others that were lucky enough to share moments with him.” Deborah Cullen-Morales, the director of the Wallach Art Gallery at Columbia University, picks out highlights, including the rousing send off by Rollins’s church choir. “I was moved by [US curator] Julie Ault's deeply felt but wryly humorous recollections—especially her notes on Tim's clothing phases over the years,” she adds.

Angel Otero shares his top picks from Frieze New York

Angel Otero shares his top picks from Frieze New York

The Art Newspaper

The Puerto Rican painter Angel Otero, who “never usually comes to fairs—it’s just a very tense environment”, perused the packed aisles of Frieze New York’s VIP preview on Wednesday (2 May) to share his thoughts on some must-see works at the fair. (His own work can be seen at Lehmann Maupin, who represents the artist in New York, and at Kavi Gupta of Chicago, Otero’s longtime dealer.)

5 Hong Kong Art Exhibitions To See In May

5 Hong Kong Art Exhibitions To See In May

Hong Kong Tatler

Catherine Opie has travelled the length and breadth of the US photographing everyone from Californian surfers to tattooed transgender women, and everything from Elizabeth Taylor’s house to the Chicago skyline at night. The Hong Kong show comprises a series of photos she took in Yosemite National Park

Frieze New York opens with strong sales in the lower price range

Frieze New York opens with strong sales in the lower price range

Financial Times

A New York collector attending Tuesday’s VIP preview of Frieze New York was wilting in temperatures reaching 30C. “Sometimes it’s just so hard to make decisions in the heat,” she said. She was in good company, joining scores of other distinguished fairgoers at the Randall’s Island Park venue, including the actress Scarlett Johansson and the new director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Max Hollein.

8 Gallery Shows to See in New York During Frieze Week​

8 Gallery Shows to See in New York During Frieze Week​

Widewalls

Titled American Landscape, the show will demonstrate how each of these artists expands our perception of what a landscape is, and how the story of the United States is told through this representation. Examining the histories and realities that often receive only peripheral glimpses, the exhibition offers an alternative perspective on the genre of landscape. The exhibition will be on view until May 5, 2018.

With Three New Shows, Artist Mary Corse is Finally Having Her Moment

With Three New Shows, Artist Mary Corse is Finally Having Her Moment

The Wall Street Journal

DRESSED IN COWBOY boots and jeans, her long blond hair pulled back in a ponytail, Mary Corse stands in her new studio, on a break from a day of painting. “It has heating now—fancy,” she says, chuckling as she compares it to her drafty old workspace. “I can get a lot more done.” Her house, which is just behind the studio, is surrounded by towering palms and a backyard barbecue, as well as lemon trees laden with ripe yellow fruit. She can’t really have pets, because of the rattlesnakes.

Three New Shows, Artist Mary Corse is Finally Having Her Moment

Three New Shows, Artist Mary Corse is Finally Having Her Moment

The Wall Street Journal

Dressed in cowboy boots and jeans, her long blond hair pulled back in a ponytail, Mary Corse stands in her new studio, on a break from a day of painting. “It has heating now—fancy,” she says, chuckling as she compares it to her drafty old workspace. “I can get a lot more done.” Her house, which is just behind the studio, is surrounded by towering palms and a backyard barbecue, as well as lemon trees laden with ripe yellow fruit. She can’t really have pets, because of the rattlesnakes.

The Artsy Vanguard: Getting Their Due

The Artsy Vanguard: Getting Their Due

Artsy

In the past few years, the art world has begun to more graciously reward artists who have honed their practice over previous decades, while remaining inexplicably under-the-radar. Artists like these 10 members of The Artsy Vanguard—a new, annual list of the 50 most influential talents shaping the future of contemporary art practice—are finally getting their due, with museum retrospectives, representation by major international galleries, and surging collector interest.

Gilbert & George

Gilbert & George

artBahrain

Working collaboratively for 50 years, Gilbert & George have consistently been at the forefront of British contemporary art. Starting out as “Living Sculptures” — making “Art for All” — they evolved into fearless “picture” makers, willing to tackle a broad range of social subjects. With a six gallery exhibition of new work, titled “The Beard Pictures,” taking place internationally, Gilbert & George recently spoke with artBahrain contributing editor Paul Laster at New York’s Lehmann Maupin about their working process, humanist values and new fascination with beards.

 

Emotional Theatricality

Emotional Theatricality

Aesthetica Magazine

Taking place over two floors and encompassing 40 photographs, Silver Lake Drive at The Photographers’ Gallery, London, is a major new exhibition that marks the first mid-career survey of artist Alex Prager. With an oeuvre than spans photography and filmmaking, Prager has enjoyed an incredibly fruitful career over the last ten years, which is celebrated here in a display of her trademark highly saturated photographs and film works.

Lehmann Maupin Announces Representation of The Estate of Heidi Bucher

Lehmann Maupin Announces Representation of The Estate of Heidi Bucher

April 23, 2018

Lehmann Maupin is pleased to announce its representation of The Heidi Bucher Estate. Heidi Bucher was a Swiss artist best known for her innovative use of latex and her exploration of the physical boundaries between the body and our surroundings. Bucher’s practice can be considered an intricate process of historical preservation and metaphorical molting, which results in the poetic visualization of the complex relationship humans have with their bodies, their past, and the spaces they inhabit. Through this intensive investigation into the female body and domestic spaces, Bucher’s work seamlessly integrated two contemporaneous themes artists were grappling with during the 1970s and 1980s: the architecture of public and private spaces, and issues of femininity and the body.

Young gallerists move from Instagram to IRL

Young gallerists move from Instagram to IRL

Financial Times

Historically under-appreciated female artists continue to be championed, with two estates recently finding big-name galleries. Lehmann Maupin now represents the Swiss-born Heidi Bucher (1926-93) in the US. Bucher was best known for her skin-like, latex casts of items ranging from clothes to entire rooms. The estate is a first for the gallery, but co-founder Rachel Lehman says it’s not a case of looking beyond the living artists they work with, more that Bucher fits well with their existing programme. Bucher has a retrospective opening in London’s Parasol Unit in September and Lehmann Maupin plans a New York show for spring 2019.

‘Do Ho Suh: Almost Home’ at Washington, D.C.’s Smithsonian American Art Museum

‘Do Ho Suh: Almost Home’ at Washington, D.C.’s Smithsonian American Art Museum

Artes Magazine

During this era of transience, migration and social technological transformation, the art of Do Ho Suh’s focusing on the importance of home is noteworthy.  Born in Korea in 1962, he came to the United States in 1991 to continue his studies at the Rhode Island School of Design and Yale University.  He is a highly accomplished artist who spends time between several cities—New York, Seoul and London. Britain currently is his place of residence even though he continues to travel internationally.  He feels his art is inspired by his transient existence and his entrenched memory of homes.

​The Tate Quietly Teams Up With Hyundai to Organize an Erwin Wurm Exhibition in Seoul

​The Tate Quietly Teams Up With Hyundai to Organize an Erwin Wurm Exhibition in Seoul

Artnet News

Meanwhile, the Austrian artist’s Hot Dog Bus will be open for business this summer in Brooklyn Bridge Park thanks to the Public Art Fund.

The Artists Who Defined the East Village’s Avant-Garde Scene

The Artists Who Defined the East Village’s Avant-Garde Scene

T Magazine

For a short time in the early ’80s, the Manhattan neighborhood was the epicenter of experimental art. Jeff Koons, Peter Halley, Ashley Bickerton, Joan Wallace and Barbara Bloom remember the moment.

Here’s the Artist List for Open Spaces Kansas City 2018

Here’s the Artist List for Open Spaces Kansas City 2018

ARTnews

Forty visual artists from ten countries have been chosen to exhibit their work at Open Spaces 2018 in Kansas City, Missouri. Other artists from performing, film, and interactive disciplines will also showcase their work at the city-wide event, which spans nine weekends from August 25 to October 28. (The others will be announced later this spring.)

'American Landscape' at Lehmann Maupin, New York

'American Landscape' at Lehmann Maupin, New York

Blouin Artinfo

The exhibition features a variety of mediums such as sculpture, photography, painting, and installation. Each artist engages in their own manner with the genres to expand our perception of what we understand as landscape. The show also highlights how the story of the United States is narrated through the artworks on display. The use of found material from Harlem, including shoes and a neon liquor store sign is what artist Nari Ward uses to create her art. It is a representation of urban American life through its physical ephemera. Catherine Opie depicts suburban America through her photographs of Los Angeles. The artist’s end-of-the-century photographs of rural America also capture the American way of life. Through the use of charcoal to create a massive, charred map installation, Teresita Fernández, suggests an American history that has been left untold. Tim Rollins & K.O.S. illustrate origins of the American narrative through literature that looks back at a troubled past.

From Baselitz to Burning Man: 28 Can’t-Miss Museum Shows to See in the United States This Spring

From Baselitz to Burning Man: 28 Can’t-Miss Museum Shows to See in the United States This Spring

Artnet News

On the East Coast, art institutions are also recognizing the vast contributions of California-born artists; the Whitney Museum is dedicating a career retrospective to Mary Corse, who is known as a pioneering figure in the West Coast Art and Light movement, while just outside the city Dia:Beacon will also host a selection of Corse’s abstract works, opening in May.

An art bus will be serving free hot dogs all summer long at Brooklyn Bridge Park

An art bus will be serving free hot dogs all summer long at Brooklyn Bridge Park

Time Out New York

Hot dogs are the quintessential summer food, so it’s fitting that they will be a central feature of Hot Dog Bus, an interactive public art installation for Brooklyn Bridge Park by Erwin Wurm, an absurdist conceptual artist from Austria. The piece is a sort of arty version of the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile, and will be giving out free hot dogs all summer long.

Public Art Fund announces three solo, mobile summer commissions

Public Art Fund announces three solo, mobile summer commissions

The Architect's Newspaper

First to be unveiled on June 9 will be Austrian artist Erwin Wurm’s Hot Dog Bus, an overstuffed converted Volkswagen Microbus that will distributing free hot dogs at multiple Brooklyn Bridge Park locations. Hot Dog Bus uses the visual language of Wurm’s Fat Car series and adapts the concept behind his 2015 Curry Bus, presented during his solo show at Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg, to serve one of New York’s defining street foods. The project continues Wurm’s interest in eliding the notions of “viewer” and “participant” by creating sculpture that invite action and involvement. ...

Cecilia Vicuña Arms her Art with an Artillery of Words

Cecilia Vicuña Arms her Art with an Artillery of Words

The Chicago Maroon

In the small yet vivid exhibition space of the Neubauer Collegium, colorful banners hang from the ceiling like flags, while photographs, poetry collections, and drawings are displayed in vitrines around the room. One of the exhibition’s standout pieces is a drawing of a sunflower-yellow rifle, with a blue fountain pen nib at its tip, against a bright red background. One word stretches across the rifle: “Palabrarma.”  

An All-Women Art Show Honors Acclaimed Artist Mickalene Thomas

An All-Women Art Show Honors Acclaimed Artist Mickalene Thomas

The Cut

Tonight the New York Academy of Art will kick off spring gala season at its 23rd annual Tribeca Ball, honoring the acclaimed artist Mickalene Thomas. The evening will feature a one-night-only all-women exhibition devoted to explorations of female sexuality.

How This Globetrotting Artist Redefines Home and Hearth

How This Globetrotting Artist Redefines Home and Hearth

Smithsonian Magazine

You are invited into Do Ho Suh’s apartment. You put down your bag, remove your coat and step inside. The hallway changes color as you proceed, first pink, then green and then blue. It’s narrow, but it feels spacious. There is a red staircase outside, and beyond it people are moving around. You can see them, right through the walls. Cabinet handles appear rigid, but the doors they sag slightly. A doorknob pulses almost imperceptibly in the breeze. Back at your house, the only things that behave this way are cobwebs, but here, everything—door panels, chain locks, light switches, sprinkler system—dissolves delightfully into colored light.

All In the Family

All In the Family

Artforum

THE SETUP of writer-performer Constance Dejong and Tony Oursler's performance Relatives is simple: a large boxy television sits on a stand at center stage, flanked by two stools. As the TV plays a video created by Oursler, DeJong delivers a fragmented monologue, gesturing to the screen as one would a PowerPoint presentation, or a friend, following its movements, touching its surface, talking to it, finding in it familiar faces of relatives, real and imagined: DeJong’s great-grandmother, mother, uncle, older sister, and younger sister, all representations of family buried just under the glass, where time is good to them. While DeJong occupies one stool, the other stool seems to anticipate the arrival of one of her kin, as if their presence might materialize through her words alone.

[Video] Catherine Opie in Conversation with Jasper Sharp

[Video] Catherine Opie in Conversation with Jasper Sharp

Parnass Kunstmagazin

As part of the Modern and Contemporary Conversation Series, the Kunsthistorisches Museum, in cooperation with PARNASS, invites four contemporary artists in 2018 whose works are part of the exhibition "The Shape of Time" (until July 8, 2018).

Public Art Fund Summer Season Serves Hot Dogs and Abstraction

Public Art Fund Summer Season Serves Hot Dogs and Abstraction

The New York Times

With his “Hot Dog Bus,” Mr. Wurm, an Austrian sculptor, is reimagining a past work, “Curry Bus,” a vintage yellow Volkswagen modified with a bloated and bulbous exterior and a counter space that resembles that of a food truck. Free hot dogs will be served from the counter throughout the summer.

OSGEMEOS Have Déjà Vu at Lehmann Maupin Hong Kong

OSGEMEOS Have Déjà Vu at Lehmann Maupin Hong Kong

Juxtapoz Magazine

April 5, 2018

There is a ton of great openings and showings in and around Art Basel week in Hong Kong right now, and one of the biggest highlights for us was the opening of OSGEMEOS's new solo show, Déjà Vu, which kicked off the week at Lehmann Maupin. The twin brothers Gustavo and Otavio Pandolfo's newest work featured a new series of paintings and a sound installation in their signature and unique style that has captured the attention of an international audience that exceeds their already legendary and famed graffiti career.

Lehmann Maupin Brings OSGEMEOS to Hong Kong For the First Time!

Lehmann Maupin Brings OSGEMEOS to Hong Kong For the First Time!

Widewalls

April 5, 2018

Although the development of urban and street art throughout the world differed depending on the context, it was always affiliated with the groups of young people full of desire to express themselves creatively and to change their social setting. As time passed by and as the very movement grew, it spread to other media from sticker art, stencil graffiti, street installations and even sculpture.

Kader Attia on 'Brilliant Ideas' | Episode 74

Kader Attia on 'Brilliant Ideas' | Episode 74

Bloomberg

April 5, 2018

Kader Attia is an activist artist. His politically charged work addresses complex global issues in symbolic and thought provoking ways. Film, installation, sculpture, photography - Kader employs a diverse range of mediums to explore problems surrounding immigration and Western colonialism. 

INTERVIEW WITH OSGEMEOS

INTERVIEW WITH OSGEMEOS

ArtAsiaPacific

Do Ho Suh's Ethereal "Homes" Depict Isolation

Do Ho Suh's Ethereal "Homes" Depict Isolation

Washington City Paper

March 30, 2018

Eerie, shimmering structures rendered in ghostly fabric are Do Ho Suh’s signature. Two versions are on view at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the artist’s East Coast debut. His “Hubs” include hallways and corridors from homes in three places where he’s lived (in Seoul, Berlin, and New York), depicted at scale in walk-through installations built in translucent fabric. So fine are the details in Suh’s recreated living quarters that it’s almost possible to read the signature on the inspection notice hanging in the hallway of the artist’s New York home, even though it’s all just stitching. Suh’s “Specimens,” on the other hand, are features separated from the whole—all the valves, switches, locks, and sockets that make up the domestic infrastructure of our lives.

12th Gwangju Biennale Announces Full List of Participating Artists and New Programs

12th Gwangju Biennale Announces Full List of Participating Artists and New Programs

Art Asia Pacific

Top Works at Kabinett Sector at Art Basel Hong Kong

Top Works at Kabinett Sector at Art Basel Hong Kong

Blouin Artinfo

Top Works at Encounters Sector at Art Basel Hong Kong

Top Works at Encounters Sector at Art Basel Hong Kong

Blouin Artinfo

Art Basel Hong Kong Opens With Record Sale, Jeff Koons

Art Basel Hong Kong Opens With Record Sale, Jeff Koons

The Hollywood Reporter

Personal Trumps Political at Art Basel Hong Kong

Personal Trumps Political at Art Basel Hong Kong

Elephant

What Not-To-Miss During Art Basel Hong Kong

What Not-To-Miss During Art Basel Hong Kong

Culture Trip

21st Biennale of Sydney

21st Biennale of Sydney

Frieze

March 29, 2018

Titled 'Superposition: Equilibrium & Engagement', the invitation is to consider accelerating global conflicts from opposing perspectives

12th Gwangju Biennale Announces Participating Artists

12th Gwangju Biennale Announces Participating Artists

ArtAsiaPacific

March 29, 2018

On March 28, the Gwangju Biennale Foundation announced the full list of participating artists for their 12th edition, slated to open in September 2018. Under the title “Imagined Borders,” the biennale will showcase the works of 153 artists from 41 countries, spread across a series of seven independently curated thematic exhibitions. The 2018 edition will see the inclusion of the largest number of Asian artists to date, with more than half of the participants coming from the region.

Art Exhibitions Now: Kader Attia At Palais De Tokyo

Art Exhibitions Now: Kader Attia At Palais De Tokyo

Harper's Bazaar Arabia

The 10 Best Booths at Art Basel in Hong Kong

The 10 Best Booths at Art Basel in Hong Kong

Artsy

Curator’s Picks: Venice Biennale Artistic Director Ralph Rugoff Selects 5 Standout Works at the Sydney Biennale

Curator’s Picks: Venice Biennale Artistic Director Ralph Rugoff Selects 5 Standout Works at the Sydney Biennale

Artnet News

March 27, 2018

What to expect at Art Basel Hong Kong 2018: huge installations and provocative discussions

What to expect at Art Basel Hong Kong 2018: huge installations and provocative discussions

SCMP

Sydney harbours a treasury of art

Sydney harbours a treasury of art

Financial Times

March 24, 2018

Cultural Highlights, Hong Kong: Alex Prager

Cultural Highlights, Hong Kong: Alex Prager

Swiss Air Magazine

“I try to overdraw reality to render it more intense, more dramatic. My goal is to heighten life by creating a sort of parallel universe.” Alex Prager, art photographer

In Memory of a Free Public: Harbour Arts Sculpture Park

In Memory of a Free Public: Harbour Arts Sculpture Park

Ocula

The Three Painters at Seattle Art Museum Challenge the History of Art

The Three Painters at Seattle Art Museum Challenge the History of Art

The Stranger

 

Three young women of color arrange themselves in front of Mickalene Thomas's painting, "Le dejeuner sur l'herbe: Les trois femmes noires" at Seattle Art Museum. The massive, 10-by-24-foot mixed-media piece is Thomas's take on a famous painting by Édouard Manet, "Le dejeuner sur l'herbe," wherein two clothed white men, a naked white woman, and a partially clothed white woman are having a messy picnic in the woods.

The Obama Portraits and the History of African American Portraiture

The Obama Portraits and the History of African American Portraiture

Hyperallergic

On February 12, the presidential portraits of Barack and Michelle Obama were unveiled at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC. Much of the commentary on the works, by African American artists Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald, has centered on questions of likeness. But such debates miss an essential point: these pictures represent the former first couple both as individuals and as archetypes of African Americans. Sherald and Wiley’s portraits are the newest additions to a long history of black representation, rooted in photography, that aimed to expand what blackness could be in America. These paintings also expand what presidential portraits can be.

STAGE DIRECTOR: ALEX PRAGER'S METICULOUS CRAFT ON VIEW @ LEHMANN MAUPIN, HONG KONG

STAGE DIRECTOR: ALEX PRAGER'S METICULOUS CRAFT ON VIEW @ LEHMANN MAUPIN, HONG KONG

Juxtapoz

Lehmann Maupin is pleased to present an exhibition of new work by Alex Prager. The Los Angeles-based artist returns to Hong Kong with her signature style of theatrical and meticulously staged photography and film, as well as her first exhibited sculpture. In her most recent series, Prager manipulates scale and dimension to challenge our understanding of the boundary between fiction and reality. The show is on view through March 17, 2018.

Hayward Gallery announces new show by Korean artist Lee Bul

Hayward Gallery announces new show by Korean artist Lee Bul

It's Nice That

Southbank Centre’s Hayward Gallery is to become the home of a new solo exhibition by South Korean artist Lee Bul.

Lee Bul: Crashing will run 30 May–19 August 2018. The exhibition is to take a backwards look at Lee’s work to date from the past three decades as well as showing new work including a series of silk velvet paintings and an installation commissioned by the gallery for the show.

9 Art Events to Attend This Week in New York City

9 Art Events to Attend This Week in New York City

ARTnews

Through work made in different styles and mediums, this group exhibition will explore the vast and multifaceted American landscape. Catherine Opie’s stark photos of Los Angeles strip malls will be displayed near Nari Ward’s neon signs sourced from Harlem storefronts and Teresita Fernández’s large charcoal maps, which suggest secret narratives and repressed stories. Works by Tim Rollins & K.O.S. use literature as a tool to investigate America’s fraught history.

Aesthetics Matter at the Volta Art Fair

Aesthetics Matter at the Volta Art Fair

Hyperallergic

A hundred years after the creation of the Dada movement‘s characteristic collage aesthetic, the Volta NY fair is championing the political nature of collage in a curated exhibition, The Aesthetics of Matter, organized by renowned artist Mickalene Thomas and her partner Racquel Chevremont, an art advisor and collector. Featuring the work of eight artists and brought together under the general theme of “ideologies of collage,” the display is the first in the couple’s new Deux Femmes Noires project, a mentorship and exhibition program dedicated to increasing the visibility of and creating new opportunities for artists of color. At least partially due to the political-collage nature of much of Thomas’s own work, The Aesthetics of Matter is both philosophical and philosophically coherent.

Kader Attia and the wounds of the past

Kader Attia and the wounds of the past

Domus

The Power Plant in Toronto hosts “The Field of Emotion”, the first solo exhibition in Canada of artist Kader Attia’s work, on view until 13 May, 2018. Curated by Carolin Köchling, the show brings together both recent and newly commissioned works focusing on the notion of repair as both a physical and a symbolic act.  “Our contemporary world is haunted by the wounds of the past”. According to Attia, wounds are irreparable, so we shouldn’t aim to fix objects and bodies, trying to hide any injuries, but rather accept the damaged as an essential part of who we are, of our history.

“The Impetus for Collage”: A conversation with Mickalene Thomas and Racquel Chevremont

“The Impetus for Collage”: A conversation with Mickalene Thomas and Racquel Chevremont

artcritical

Artist Mickalene Thomas and collector/art advisor Racquel Chevremont met up with William Corwin of artcritical.com to discuss their upcoming curatorial project at the Volta art fair, The Aesthetics of Matter. They also candidly discuss the artist/subject relationship on display in Mickalene’s paintings currently exhibited in the exhibition “Figuring History” at the Seattle Art Museum. Volta is open to the public March 7 to 11, 2018.

A Mickalene Thomas-Curated Show About Collage Works, and Inclusion

A Mickalene Thomas-Curated Show About Collage Works, and Inclusion

Garage

Collage matters right now—at least according to the Volta NY special exhibition curators, artist Mickalene Thomas and collector and consultant Racquel Chevremont. Charged with organizing a group exhibition for the curated section of the Armory Show’s sister fair this year, the duo decided to focus on cut-and-paste.

Volta Artistic Director Amanda Coulson: "A Fair Of Solo Booths Is Easier To Take In"

Volta Artistic Director Amanda Coulson: "A Fair Of Solo Booths Is Easier To Take In"

Forbes

Volta, the fair was one of the pioneers of the solo booth, opens today in New York at Pier 90 for its 11th edition, which runs through March 11. Eighty-five galleries from four continents and 48 cities — including Lena & Roselli Gallery from Budapest, Richard Koh Fine Art from Kuala Lumpur and Galleria Bianconi from Milan — will exhibit work by artists — Aubrey Levinthal, Bruno Miguel, Cheryl Pope and more — from 32 countries. The fair tapped Mickalene Thomas and Racquel Chevremont to co-curate The Aesthetics of Matter, the Volta’s curated section. I quizzed Volta’s co-founder and artistic director Amanda Coulson on the fair’s target market, the collaboration with Thomas and Chevremont, and the difference between the New York and Basel editions.

Three-story section of Robin Hood Gardens will be shown at Venice Biennale

Three-story section of Robin Hood Gardens will be shown at Venice Biennale

The Architect's Newspaper

Few buildings are as quintessentially British and Brutalist as Robin Hood Gardens, a London housing estate designed by Alison and Peter Smithson in the late 1960s. And now, remnants of the complex are heading to Italy, where the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) will present a facade section of the demolished icon as part of the Venice Biennale. ...The segment will be displayed on a scaffolding system designed by Arup, the firm that engineered the original Robin Hood Gardens, while a film by artist Do Ho Suh will document the structure. Additional documents and interviews will give context to the social history of the complex.

Pérez Art Museum Miami honors Artist Teresita Fernández hosting Fourth Annual Art of the Party

Pérez Art Museum Miami honors Artist Teresita Fernández hosting Fourth Annual Art of the Party

Blouin Artinfo

Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM) is hosting the fourth annual Art of the Party, the museum’s largest fundraiser event of the year honoring Teresita Fernández. The event is set to take place on March 17, 2018, and will be presented by Valentino.

Deux Femmes Noires Builds a Platform for Artists of Color

Deux Femmes Noires Builds a Platform for Artists of Color

The Standard

In conversation, the artist Mickalene Thomas, and her partner and muse, the art consultant and collector Racquel Chevremont, have the couple’s habit of interrupting each another, talking over one another, and seamlessly picking up where the other left off. While this makes the task of interviewing them somewhat challenging, it gets to the heart of their new project Deux Femmes Noires. Years in the making, and debuting at the Volta New York art fairOpens a New Window. with a curated show, “The Aesthetics of Matter,”  they’re setting out to increase visibility and opportunities for artists of color through two areas of focus: first, by working directly with artists to provide guidance and career opportunities; and second, by curating shows, advising institutions, and securing funding for exhibitions. The goal is to push artists of color—with an emphasis on female artists of color—to greater prominence in the art world.
 

Kim Guiline

Kim Guiline

The Asian Art Newspaper

Although Kim Guiline’s career spans more than fve decades, it is only recently that he has gained international recognition. Indeed, Western collectors and institutions have just begun, a few years ago, to go beyond their interest in contemporary art from Korea and explore the art scene of Korea from the 1950s onwards. One of the key movements of that time was Dansaekhwa, which was established either in mid-1950s, or the mid-1970s according to some sources, brought the work of its members to international attention. Kim Guiline (b 1936, Korea), although based in France, has been associated with this movement as his work has, over time, followed a similar path to those of his counterparts in Korea. Seen as a response to the dictatorship, Dansaekhwa’s aim was to create works, mainly abstract, that were neutral in terms of content, allowing artists to continue to paint in a difcult atmosphere. Over the years, the artist restricted forms and palette to reach a stage of monochrome paintings that echoed his rich poetic interior universe. Looking back, he discusses his career from the moment he arrived in France in the early 1960s.

TIM ROLLINS (1955–2017)

TIM ROLLINS (1955–2017)

Artforum

AFTER TIM DIED, I incessantly watched videos of him conducting workshops and giving his remarkable preaching-and-teaching talks. Quick to coin a potent phrase, Tim’s audacity was intelligent and strategic. “Do you want to make history?” he’d yell at a group of students. Locking eyes with a possible Kids of Survival—or K.O.S.—recruit, he’d solemnly ask, “Do you believe in love at first sight?” The room came alive when Tim spoke. Don’t take my word for it. See for yourself. He was on fire his entire life.

Alex Prager: Syrup with Medicine

Alex Prager: Syrup with Medicine

Photography is Art

Alex Prager's highly proficient artistic sense effortlessly lured her into the world of photography. Not only has she built a career on it, her interest also extends into filmmaking, placing her under the international spotlight of photography and film. Many of her achievements such as the 2012 Emmy award and publications in prominent magazines, including New York Magazine and Vogue have validated her professionalism and passion for her craft.

 

Billionaires Glean Art Market Intelligence Over $7,500 Beer Can

Billionaires Glean Art Market Intelligence Over $7,500 Beer Can

Bloomberg

Hill would make it there, but first he put his arm around dealer Rachel Lehmann to scan Catherine Opie’s photographs of Yosemite National Park and had a long chat with dealer Sean Kelly next to a Jose Davila riff on Pablo Picasso.

McArthur Binion Heads to Lehmann Maupin

McArthur Binion Heads to Lehmann Maupin

ARTnews

Hot on the heels of his star turn in “Viva Arte Viva,” the main show at the Venice Biennale last year, artist McArthur Binion has joined Lehmann Maupin, which will show his work at its Hong Kong space this fall and its forthcoming location at 501 West 24th Street in January.

Connoisseur-Worthy Highlights From the ADAA’s 30th Anniversary Art Fair

Connoisseur-Worthy Highlights From the ADAA’s 30th Anniversary Art Fair

Artnet News

Why It’s Fascinating: Famous as a photographer, Opie has been quietly experimenting in ceramics the past few years, taking advantage of the proximity of the dark room and the ceramics studio at UCLA, where she teaches. This is the first time she’s shown her sculpture in public, and she’s only done so at the insistence of her dealer, David Maupin.

ADAA's Art Show misses Armory week crowds, but focused displays of challenging works still prove popular

ADAA's Art Show misses Armory week crowds, but focused displays of challenging works still prove popular

The Art Newspaper

Fewer dealers than in recent years chose to unveil new bodies of work. However, Lehmann Maupin mounted new Yosemite landscape photographs by Catherine Opie, paired with the artist’s first forays into forest-themed ceramics.

ICP’s 2018 Infinity Award winners

ICP’s 2018 Infinity Award winners

British Journal of Photography

Amber Bracken, whose work focuses on the relationship between indigenous communities and the government in North America, has won the Documentary and Photojournalism Award, and Juergen Teller has won the Special Presentation.

At the 30th-Anniversary ADAA Art Show, Dealers Bring the New and Artists Lampoon Trump

At the 30th-Anniversary ADAA Art Show, Dealers Bring the New and Artists Lampoon Trump

ARTnews

Another small surprise came at the booth of Lehmann Maupin, of New York and Hong Kong, where the photographer Catherine Opie debuted new ceramics. These are very unusual works for Opie, who has for years exhibited her sharp pictures of queer communities, Los Angeles, and landscapes (some lovely out-of-focus photographs of American forests were on view here, too). The ceramics resemble charred tree trunks and knotty wood, and they are exhibited on a low wooden plinth. Over in Los Angeles, at Regen Projects, Opie just debuted her first film, The Modernist; now, she’s revealed sculptures. What will she get up to next?

New York's International Center of Photography Names 2018 Infinity Award Winners

New York's International Center of Photography Names 2018 Infinity Award Winners

Artforum

The International Center of Photography (ICP) in New York has announced the winners of its annual Infinity Awards, which honor outstanding achievements in photography and the visual arts. They will be presented to the recipients at an awards ceremony that will take place at Spring Studios on April 9.

The All-Woman Wing Social Club Debuts Its Lavish New Brooklyn Space With a Feminist Art Show

The All-Woman Wing Social Club Debuts Its Lavish New Brooklyn Space With a Feminist Art Show

Artnet News

Dotting the soaring, light-filled space are works by ​Alex Prager, Alice Lancaster, Lana Barkin, Tina Barney, Pamela Hanson, Louise Parker, and Martine Fougeron, among others. The works are all for sale, as are those in the Picture Room, a woman-run gallery housed in the new Brooklyn outpost of the Wing.

Watch: Gilbert & George take in the Belfast sights amid exhibition success​

Watch: Gilbert & George take in the Belfast sights amid exhibition success​

Belfast Telegraph

Mickalene Thomas on "Figuring History"

Mickalene Thomas on "Figuring History"

Cultured

The Seattle Art Museum’s highly anticipated exhibition “Figuring History” brings together—for the first time—three of the most celebrated contemporary artists of color: Robert Colescott, Kerry James Marshall and Mickalene Thomas. On the opening evening of the show, Cultured talks to Mickalene about what it’s like to be part of this major assembly of artists that are continuing to reshape the art world.

REPAINTING HISTORY AT THE SEATTLE ART MUSEUM

REPAINTING HISTORY AT THE SEATTLE ART MUSEUM

The Spectator

The youngest artist, Mickalene Thomas, negotiates the intersectionality of race, gender, and sexuality through a contemporary female gaze with figures that are loud and confrontational. Thomas also curated an interactive area where guests can sit and admire her works among the patterned furniture she specially crafted and read her pieces of literature she personally selected.

Interview with Mickalene Thomas and Racquel Chevremont Curators for Volta’s 2018 Section

Interview with Mickalene Thomas and Racquel Chevremont Curators for Volta’s 2018 Section

Arte Fuse

Well, my curatorial philosophy is shaped by a personal and passionate endeavor to see more artists like myself on the same platform as me. With that in mind, as an artist that curates shows not a curator I bring a different perspective. I think of particular themes such as The Aesthetics of Matter that will create a strong dialogue around particular art practices and ideas that people can relate too.

Robin Rhode

Robin Rhode

Film Screenings, March 3 & 10, 2018

February 21, 2018

On the occasion of his exhibition The Geometry of Colour, Lehmann Maupin will screen a selection of Robin Rhode's animations throughout the day on Saturday, March 3 and Saturday, March 10 at 536 West 22nd Street, New York. 

Each day will also feature a special screening of Rhode's Performa 15 commission, Arnold Schönberg's Erwartung - A Performance by Robin Rhode at 2 PM. Set in New York City’s Times Square, the intimate one-person opera is scaled to dramatic proportions within this most public of settings, giving a candid and global voice to the social and cultural trauma of South African racial politics and migrant labor; a woman’s anguish explodes on the streets of New York as an operatic monument to lamentation.

Do Ho Suh: Almost Home

Do Ho Suh: Almost Home

Azure

Do Ho Suh’s immersive architectural installations—unexpectedly crafted with ethereal fabric—are spaces that are at once deeply familiar and profoundly alien. Suh is internationally renowned for his “fabric architecture” sculptures that explore the global nature of contemporary identity as well as memory, migration, and our ideas of home.

Tony Oursler and Pascal Rousseau in conversation

Tony Oursler and Pascal Rousseau in conversation

Centre Pompidou

February 19, 2018

Video et après
Monday, February 19, 2018
Cinema 1, Centre Pompidou
Paris, France

Mickalene Thomas and Racquel Chevremont Team Up for VOLTA NY 2018

Mickalene Thomas and Racquel Chevremont Team Up for VOLTA NY 2018

Widewalls

The Aesthetics of Matter, as this thematic show is titled, is set to present a group of artists exploring the ideologies of collage within their practice, through the means of material, language, text, cultural and personal concepts. That said, it will feature artwork ranging from painting and sculpture to photography, video, text and printed matter, all relating to collage as a construct.

Juergen Teller project helps young people respond to Grenfell

Juergen Teller project helps young people respond to Grenfell

The Guardian

The photographer Juergen Teller has teamed up with 20 young people affected by the Grenfell Tower disaster, in a project that aims to document their lives and perspectives on the fallout from the fire seven months ago.

Your Week in Culture...

Your Week in Culture...

The New York Times

Robert Colescott’s brutally pointed large-scale cartoons — most famously “George Washington Carver Crossing the Delaware,” his infinitely satirical all-black remix of Emanuel Leutze’s 1851 original. Mickalene Thomas’s bright patchworks of psychedelic stained-glass hyperbole. Kerry James Marshall’s inspired use of art historical allusion and the color black.

Klara Kristalova - Why I Create

Klara Kristalova - Why I Create

Phaidon

Weekend In Art: Kader Attia's First Museum Solo In Toronto

Weekend In Art: Kader Attia's First Museum Solo In Toronto

Harper's Bazaar Arabia

Curated by Karolin Koechling, KaderAttia’s The Field of Emotion tackles wounds of the past and notions of literal and symbolic repair. However, rather than an act of restoration, Attia’s practice has revolved around the concept of repair of circumstances and occurrences that are technically irreparable in what he refers to as “a Modernity obsessed with the disappearance of injury.” Addressing societies spanning Africa to Japan, Attia looks to the visual traces of history left on objects. “The work of art holds a crucial role in the restorative process. Besides the fact that it itself incarnates reparation, it questions a political horizon affecting all categories of society. It is always discussed, hated, but never insignificant. Why? Because it embodies the field of emotion!” stated Attia.

Seattle Art Museum’s ‘Figuring History’ a powerful look at who is represented in art

Seattle Art Museum’s ‘Figuring History’ a powerful look at who is represented in art

The Seattle Times

A powerful, important exhibition that really must be experienced in person: SAM brings together paintings by Robert Colescott, Kerry James Marshall and Mickalene Thomas, three artists who re-imagine a Western painting tradition that largely shut out people of color.

Re-Presenting Black History in Art

Re-Presenting Black History in Art

Seattle Weekly

Over at Seattle Art Museum, artistic representations of blackness from the past century get a blockbuster show in Figuring History, featuring works by Robert Colescott, Mickalene Thomas, and Kerry James Marshall. Perhaps no other living artist has refigured representations of blackness in painting as much as Marshall, whose decades-long career has been defined by inserting contemporary treatments of black figures into compositions emulating classical paintings in the Grand Manner (by Jacques-Louis David and Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, for example). Combining these with works by Thomas and Colescott means means Figuring History is bound to be a stunner of a show.

In Kader Attia’s show at the Power Plant, tracks from colonialism’s bloody past lead to here and now

In Kader Attia’s show at the Power Plant, tracks from colonialism’s bloody past lead to here and now

Toronto Star

The scent of creosote, faint but distinct, hangs in the air at the Power Plant. It’s the whiff of progress, drenched in blood. Here, an angular sweep of crumbling railway ties lie neatly on the gallery floor. “Some Modernity’s Footprints” is the anodyne title given to the work by its maker, the French-Algerian artist Kader Attia, who is having his Canadian debut here. But depending less and less on your point of view, there’s nothing neutral about modernity’s whipsaw transformation of the planet over the past couple of hundred years and all the blood it’s spilled along the way.

An Exhibition That Retells America’s Past Comes to the Seattle Art Museum

An Exhibition That Retells America’s Past Comes to the Seattle Art Museum

The Wall Street Journal

AN UPCOMING EXHIBITION at the Seattle Art Museum (SAM), which features works by artists Kerry James Marshall, Mickalene Thomas and the late Robert Colescott, reexamines history painting as an art form used to represent past narratives. Figuring History offers a retelling of America’s past through the African-American perspective, largely absent from the genre.

Artist Mickalene Thomas Has a Message For Right Now: Resist

Artist Mickalene Thomas Has a Message For Right Now: Resist

Observer

Few contemporary artists have so thoroughly monopolized a material as Mickalene Thomas has the rhinestone. The Brooklyn-based, New Jersey native employs the faux gems in her trademark collages and paintings, many of which depict black women in 1970s-tinged settings. Dark wood and vibrant patterns abound, as do afros. Thomas’s broad fan-base ranges from New York Times critic Roberta Smith to Solange, whose “True” EP cover she designed.

Figuring History with Robert Colescott, Kerry James Marshall and Mickalene Thomas

Figuring History with Robert Colescott, Kerry James Marshall and Mickalene Thomas

Widewalls

Featuring works by Robert Colescott, Kerry James Marshalland Mickalene Thomas, this exhibition may be presenting artists from different periods in time, but all three of them used their paintings to challenge Western tradition and its constant misrepresentation of people of color.

Peabody Essex Museum to Open “PlayTime”

Peabody Essex Museum to Open “PlayTime”

Boston Magazine

Showcasing 40 works by 17 artists, “Playtime” includes a range of mediums, from videos and sculptures to three groundbreaking interactive works, which give visitors a role within the exhibition. Martin Creed’s interactive piece captures the essence of fun through an immersive room filled with pink balloons. The other two works are participatory: Erwin Wurm’s One Minute Sculptures encourages visitors to jump inside the exhibition by striking poses next to everyday objects, while the third interactive work allows museum-goers to pin words from global protest signs on their clothing or on a world map without country boundaries—only lines of latitude and longitude.

Lehmann Maupin to Represent Top Chilean Artist Cecilia Vicuña

Lehmann Maupin to Represent Top Chilean Artist Cecilia Vicuña

Blouin Artinfo

Lehmann Maupin, New York recently announced its representation of multidisciplinary Chilean artist Cecilia Vicuña (b. 1948, Santiago).

Juergen Teller Honored at ICP Infinity Awards

Juergen Teller Honored at ICP Infinity Awards

Juergen Teller will be honored at the International Center for Photography's 34th Infinity Awards. Since 1985, the ICP Infinity Awards have recognized major contributions and emerging talent in the fields of photojournalism, art, fashion photography, and publishing. All proceeds from the Infinity Awards benefit ICP’s full range of programs, including exhibitions, collections, community outreach, scholarships, and the ICP School. 

 

New York — Robin Rhode: The Geometry of Colour Is On View at Lehmann Maupin Through March 10, 2018

New York — Robin Rhode: The Geometry of Colour Is On View at Lehmann Maupin Through March 10, 2018

Art Observed

Utilizing socially-engaged practice and urbanism to reflect on prevalent socio-political climates, artist Robin Rhode is known for his work in photography and film, chronicling everyday life through cityscapes and urban architecture. His current exhibition at Lehmann Maupin aligns with his work about the post-apartheid South Africa.  In this show, however, the territory he looks to for inspiration is the Middle East. After spending time in the region on the occasion of his exhibition at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Rhode witnessed the dynamics between Israelis and Palestinians in terms of power, opportunity, and freedom, and sought to represent these situations here.

The Art Market

The Art Market

Financial Times

The Big 3-0

The Big 3-0

Modern Painters

One highlight of the fair comes from New York dealer Lehmann Maupin, which will present new photographs by Catherine Opie. Work by the celebrated photographer will include Rainbow Falls (2015, pigment print) and Stump Fire #1 (2012, pigment print). 

Tim Rollins 1955–2017

Tim Rollins 1955–2017

Art Monthly

'I'm not a missionary, but I'm on a mission.'

This was a constant refrain from Tim Rollins. As a member of the Kids of Survival (KOS) for the past 31 years, I had the privelege of witnessing Tim's efforts in achieving his mission and, in the process, witnessing a life well lived.

Slow Painting

Slow Painting

Art in America

OSGEMEOS Prepares for Their Newest Solo Exhibit in Hong Kong

OSGEMEOS Prepares for Their Newest Solo Exhibit in Hong Kong

Juxtapoz

From humble beginnings in 1980s as graffiti writers in their São Paulo neighborhood of Cambuci, to museum and high end gallery shows worldwide, OSGEMEOS are preparing for another milestone event this year. On March 26th, Lehmann Maupin in Hong Kong will be opening Déjà Vu, the first solo exhibition by the Brazilian artists in Hong Kong.

Robin Rhode: Under the Sun

Robin Rhode: Under the Sun

Elephant

There’s a certain amount of evangelism in the way Robin Rhode speaks about his latest work. “What is key to this whole series is this crack in the wall,” he says, pointing out a long, jagged seam pervading the series of photographs he’s created of his otherwise perfected large-scale, colourful wall drawings of various shapes, painted on an unidentifiable street somewhere in Johannesburg. “When something is cracked it means it’s breaking; it’s broken. I like to think of my work as something that’s forcing itself through that crack. That wall, it’s going to collapse. Like the Walls of Jericho.

Best New Art: OSGEMEOS Solo Exhibit...

Best New Art: OSGEMEOS Solo Exhibit...

Hypebeast

The Zurich Art Prize 2018 goes to Robin Rhode

The Zurich Art Prize 2018 goes to Robin Rhode

Haus Konstruktiv

Museum Haus Konstruktiv and Zurich Insurance Group Ltd are very pleased to announce the eleventh winner of the internationally renowned Zurich Art Prize: in 2018, this art prize goes to South African artist Robin Rhode. The prize sum of CHF 100,000 consists of a CHF 80,000 budget for the production of a solo exhibition at Museum Haus Konstruktiv and CHF 20,000 in prize money.

Angel Otero at Lehmann Maupin

Angel Otero at Lehmann Maupin

Elliman

Brooklyn-based Angel Otero is having a busy fall and winter. Works by the 36-year-old Puerto Rican-born artist are showcased in Angel Otero: Elegies at the Bronx Museum until April 29.

Spotlight On Mary Corse

Spotlight On Mary Corse

Architectural Digest

Nestled in a canyon on the outskirts of Los Angeles, artist Mary Corse’s house and studio are a short drive—but a world away—from the city’s hustle and bustle. Cell service cuts out en route to her home, which is reached via a single-lane bridge and winding dirt road. Neighbors are few and far between, affording Corse ample room to paint in private. Which is what she’s been doing—quietly, steadily—for more than five decades, building an important body of work while innovating on pace with established pioneers of the Light and Space movement. This May, however, she will take an overdue step center stage, with a long-term installation at Dia:Beacon and a debut show at London’s Lisson Gallery, followed by her first solo museum survey at the Whitney in June.

Mickalene Thomas, Shinique Smith, and Others Are Making Art for LA’s New Metro Line

Mickalene Thomas, Shinique Smith, and Others Are Making Art for LA’s New Metro Line

Hyperallergic

Many of the commissioned pieces draw on local histories. Also at Leimert Park Station, Mickalene Thomas has made a typically rhythmic picture depicting the Art Deco-style Vision Theatre, the futuristic Theme Building at the Los Angeles International Airport, and the fountain at Leimert Park. And, to find inspiration for his installation at Hyde Park Station, Carlson Hattonwalked around the surrounding area, listening to the music people played in their homes. His mural portrays a band in a vibrant landscape

Art installation to mark end of major restoration

Art installation to mark end of major restoration

Northumberland Gazette

Lindisfarne Castle will reopen this spring after an 18-month period of conservation, with a new site-specific installation by internationally-acclaimed artist Anya Gallaccio.

Robin Rhode Explores ‘The Geometry of Colour’ at Lehmann Maupin

Robin Rhode Explores ‘The Geometry of Colour’ at Lehmann Maupin

WWD

The South African artist, who is based in Berlin, possesses an infectious energy. He greets all of the gallery’s staff with the same level of enthusiastic attentiveness that he uses to describe his work mounted on the wall. The multi-disciplinary artist paints large-scale wall murals, photographing them with the addition of a performer; the resulting photograph is the final product. His latest show exhibits a series of mathematically inspired work.

The Artist Seeking out the Cinematic in Everyday Life

The Artist Seeking out the Cinematic in Everyday Life

AnOther

“I can see drama in everything... even when there is none”: LA native Alex Prager tells AnOther about the themes underpinning her new Hong Kong exhibition

Robin Rhode Has a Lot of Feelings About Geometry

Robin Rhode Has a Lot of Feelings About Geometry

Garage

In a body of work made over the past two years, Cape Town-born artist Robin Rhode rejects, in his term, “the current African aesthetic.” Running counter to what he perceives as a tendency toward embellishment, his photographic series The Geometry of Colour, on view at Lehmann Maupin in New York, depicts simple yet vibrant large-scale geometric wall paintings. “There’s an overly eccentric use of elements and the body is very present,” Rhode comments on contemporary African work. “There’s an emphasis on decolonization, the social condition, and the reclaiming of space. My intention was to work with a palette that is reductive. There’s a vibrancy in the color, but it’s very coded, very mathematical.” 

Con Cón, Chile, 1966 – 2006

Con Cón, Chile, 1966 – 2006

The Brooklyn Rail

My art was born at the meeting point of two waters, the Aconcagua River and the Pacific Ocean, at a site the first peoples of Chile called Con cón: “Water water”.

Three to see in Hong Kong

Three to see in Hong Kong

Art Review

There’s something pleasingly over-the-top in Alex Prager’s photographs. While the subject (a woman crossing the street, a crowded club) often suggests something of street photography, the photographs instantly reveal their own artificiality, so apparent is the staging that went into their creation.

Complex Representations

Complex Representations

Aesthetica Magazine

The meticulously staged photographs and films of Los Angeles-based artist Alex Prager (b. 1979) revel in this confusion, using manipulation to challenge perceptions of certainty and fiction. A recent series, on display at Lehmann Maupin, Hong Kong, uses scale and dimension to highlight the palpable artifice of its own creation

New Narratives by Alex Prager at Lehmann Maupin

New Narratives by Alex Prager at Lehmann Maupin

Widewalls

For their latest show, at Lehmann Maupin they prepared an interesting selection of new works made by Alex Prager, a Los Angeles-based experimental photographer already accustomed to presenting artworks in Hong Kong.

Editors’ Picks: 10 Things to See in New York This Week

Editors’ Picks: 10 Things to See in New York This Week

Artnet News

RoseLee Goldberg in Conversation with artist Robin Rhode at NeueHouse Madison Square

Alex Prager: The artist who straddles the real and the imagined

Alex Prager: The artist who straddles the real and the imagined

CNN Style

January 11, 2018

Alex Prager's work is meticulously staged. And yet, it captures the lucid moments of humanity found only in the most candid of photography.

Marilyn Minter’s Largest-Ever Public Art Installation Is Coming to a New York City Mall

Marilyn Minter’s Largest-Ever Public Art Installation Is Coming to a New York City Mall

Artnet News

A shopping mall might seem like an unlikely site to encounter work by feminist artist Marilyn Minter. But the artist, known for her unapologetically provocative paintings and videos, will take over the advertising screens beneath the soaring Oculus at New York’s Westfield World Trade Center and Westfield Century City in Los Angeles starting January 11. It is her largest project in New York to date.

Alex Prager: The artist who straddles the real and the imagined

Alex Prager: The artist who straddles the real and the imagined

CNN

Alex Prager's work is meticulously staged. And yet, it captures the lucid moments of humanity found only in the most candid of photography.

Tim Rollins Dies at 62; Turned Bronx Teenagers Into Art Stars

Tim Rollins Dies at 62; Turned Bronx Teenagers Into Art Stars

The New York Times

Feline Fantasy

Feline Fantasy

Prestige

LA-based artist Alex Prager returns to Hong Kong for another exhibition at Lehmann Maupin, bringing together diverse pieces from her photography oeuvre, all of which showcase meticulously staged tableaux.

Split Screen

Split Screen

#legend

ALEX PRAGER brings her snappy, catchy ambiguity to Hong Kong.

STEPHEN SHORT gets to know the cinematic starlet of the art world

Feminist Forms

Feminist Forms

Flash Art

Julia Bryan-Wilson on the fleeting-yet-emphatic multimedia art of Cecilia Vicuña

Kader Attia

Kader Attia

ArtReview

At the Power Plant, in his show The Field of Emotions, Kader Attia channels Gance: in J'Accuse (I Accuse) (2016) he screens the later film for an array of elevated wooden busts based on the mangled men, silent witnesses to historical forgetfulness, and men who were traumatised twice: first by the war itself, then by how society reacted to their deformations.

THE BEARD PICTURES: Gilbert & George At Lehmann Maupin, New York

Forbes

December 13, 2017

Mega! What an apt, often British exclamation to describe something that is really huge or really good. Gilbert & George’s THE BEARD PICTURES is both and more. In fact, “mega” is understatement for this 50th anniversary show of shows, which will be seen in six cities between now and March 2018.Mega! What an apt, often British exclamation to describe something that is really huge or really good. Gilbert & George’s THE BEARD PICTURES is both and more. In fact, “mega” is understatement for this 50th anniversary show of shows, which will be seen in six cities between now and March 2018.Mega! What an apt, often British exclamation to describe something that is really huge or really good. Gilbert & George’s THE BEARD PICTURES is both and more. In fact, “mega” is understatement for this 50th anniversary show of shows, which will be seen in six cities between now and March 2018.Mega! What an apt, often British exclamation to describe something that is really huge or really good. Gilbert & George’s THE BEARD PICTURES is both and more. In fact, “mega” is understatement for this 50th anniversary show of shows, which will be seen in six cities between now and March 2018.

Tim Rollins + K.O.S.

Tim Rollins + K.O.S.

Parkett

Artists' Statements for Parkett 100/101

Holiday Pop-Up Shop Supporting Puerto Rico

Holiday Pop-Up Shop Supporting Puerto Rico

December 1, 2017

Lehmann Maupin, in partnership with Artspace, will host a pop-up holiday shop at its Chelsea gallery, featuring prints, unique works, artist books, posters, merchandise, and a selection of the gallery's anniversary editions. A portion of proceeds will benefit ConPRmetidos, an organization supporting those affected by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico. There will be an opening reception on December 14 from 6-8 PM, and the shop will be open from 10 AM-6 PM on December 15 and 16.

Lehmann Maupin announces new location in Seoul

Lehmann Maupin announces new location in Seoul

November 1, 2017

Lehmann Maupin is pleased to announce the opening of a viewing office in Seoul, the gallery’s second space in Asia.

The viewing office will officially open on December 14, 2017, with an inaugural presentation of works by some of the gallery's artists.

TROPICAL FANTASIES, DARK HISTORIES

Art in America

October 31, 2017

Calypso music, evoking carefree rum- and sun-soaked pleasures, and colorful hanging bottles of Tropical Fantasy soda lured passersby under the glowing yellow awning of the Happy Smilers bodega. This was the entryway to the first installation encountered by visitors to Nari Ward’s retrospective, “Sun Splashed,” at the Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston, the touring show’s last stop. 

Deconstructed Reconstructed

Deconstructed Reconstructed

New York Spaces

"From a young age, I have been making art in general, including drawings and paintings. I always wanted to create," says Puerto Rican-born artist Angel Otero. But it wasn't until his teens that the realization really took form—while walking around the Museo de Arte de Puerto Rico he was frozen in his tracks by a painting by Arnaldo Roche Rabell.

Kader Attia Awarded Joan Miró Prize

Kader Attia Awarded Joan Miró Prize

October 16, 2017

Lehmann Maupin is pleased to share that Kader Attia has been awarded the sixth Joan Miró Prize. The prize, which is awarded by Fundació Joan Miró and Obra Social "la Caixa," is one of the most prestigious and generous contemporary art awards in the world.

Jessica Kreps Named Partner at Lehmann Maupin

Jessica Kreps Named Partner at Lehmann Maupin

October 10, 2017

Rachel Lehmann and David Maupin are pleased to announce that Jessica Kreps has been named Partner at Lehmann Maupin. Kreps joined the gallery in 2009 and became a Director in 2014. Prior to Lehmann Maupin, Kreps was a Sales Director at Two Palms gallery. Born in Montreal, and raised in New York, Kreps attended Nightingale-Bamford School, and graduated with a BA in Art History (Highest Honors) from Emory University in Atlanta. In addition to her work in sales, Kreps has also served as an artist liaison at Lehmann Maupin for Kader Attia and Shirazeh Houshiary. She speaks fluent French and is currently a member of the Artist’s Council at the Whitney Museum of American Art​ ​in​ ​New​ ​York.

Gilbert & George to Launch London Foundation in 2019

Gilbert & George to Launch London Foundation in 2019

Artforum

October 5, 2017

Anny Shaw of the Art Newspaper reports that British art duo Gilbert & George are preparing to launch a nonprofit foundation in London to exhibit their work and, if funding permits, the work of others. They are refurbishing an old brewery they purchased for about $6.6 million. The foundation is scheduled to open sometime in 2019.

Gilbert & George: East Enders

Gilbert & George: East Enders

The Art Newspaper

October 5, 2017

In the 50 years since the British artists Gilbert & George met as students at St Martin’s School of Art and moved to Spitalfields, the East London neighbourhood has seen Jewish bagel shops giving way to Bangladeshi curry houses, which are now being replaced by trendy cafés. The changing face of Spitalfields has inspired the duo’s most recent series, the Beard Pictures, which refer to everything from Santa Claus to Shoreditch hipsters and will debut this autumn at White Cube in London, New York’s Lehmann Maupin and Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac in Paris. We took this opportunity to let Gilbert & George show us around their stomping ground.

The 15 New York Shows You Need to See This October

The 15 New York Shows You Need to See This October

Artsy

October 2, 2017

When is a beard more than just a beard? For the famed, inseparable British performance duo, facial hair gets conceptual in a series of large-scale works. Apparently, their interest was piqued by the hirsute young hipsters in their own London neighborhood. Here, Gilbert & George—clean-shaven in real life—reimagine themselves with psychedelic whiskers that turn into fences, monsters, and fall foliage.

Three to See: New York

Three to See: New York

September 29, 2017

The Light and Space artist Mary Corse does not consider her work to be complete until it is experienced by a viewer—and a visit to her solo exhibition of recent work at Lehmann Maupin (until 7 October) shows why. The light that hits her large-scale, black-and-white striped canvases is a crucial part of the work. The white stripes have a silk sheen when viewed from a distance and the black ones, made of tiny acrylic squares that resemble sequins, twinkle as you move around. Textures only become clear up close and Corse uses the same reflective material that is used to make road markings. The exhibition also shows one historic work by Corse, Black Light Painting (1975), which uses the same materials as the new works to demonstrate the consistency of her style.

‘The Painting’s Not Really on the Wall’: Mary Corse on 50 Years of Her Elusive, Seductive Art, and Shows in Los Angeles and New York

‘The Painting’s Not Really on the Wall’: Mary Corse on 50 Years of Her Elusive, Seductive Art, and Shows in Los Angeles and New York

ARTnews

September 29, 2017

Mary Corse has never identified with Light and Space as a California movement. “I’m not a landscape painter,” she told me, as she has told interviewers before. “So if I were in New York I’d do the same thing.” Her work is not regional, in other words. She has also never liked being identified as a “woman artist,” she said. “So I didn’t do all-women shows. That didn’t help me either.” She’s not sure she likes being identified at all. “I don’t really identify even with my name,” she says. “I am not. People say, Are you Mary Corse? [And I say,] ‘Once in a while.’ ”

Gilbert & George take charge of their legacy

Gilbert & George take charge of their legacy

The Art Newspaper

September 28, 2017

"Art for all” is the motto behind Gilbert & George’s career, a belief that also defines how they approach their market. This autumn, to mark their 50th anniversary, the artists are unveiling 170 new Beard Pictures at their galleries in New York, Paris and London. Smaller satellite shows are planned for Brussels, Athens and Naples.

OSGEMEOS

OSGEMEOS

Mural on 14th Street, New York

September 28, 2017

Brazilian artists OSGEMEOS have recently completed a large-scale mural spanning two walls in New York City, on 14th Street between 6th and 7th Avenues. Combining traditional, folkloric, and contemporary elements of Brazilian culture with graffiti, hip-hop, and international youth culture, the artists have created an expansive body of work that includes murals, paintings, sculpture, site-specific installations, and video. They use a symbolic visual language often inspired by their dreams that, as twins, they claim to share. For more information about OSGEMEOS, click here.

Photo: Martha Cooper

Book Signing: Gilbert & George, THE BEARD PICTURES

Book Signing: Gilbert & George, THE BEARD PICTURES

October 14, 2017 | 12-2 PM

September 28, 2017

On the occasion of Gilbert & George, THE BEARD PICTURES, opening at both of Lehmann Maupin's New York galleries on Thursday, October 12, the artists will be available to sign copies of the exhibition catalogue Saturday, October 14 from 12-2 PM at 536 West 22nd Street, New York.

THE BEARD PICTURES exemplifies Gilbert & George’s commitment to “Living Sculpture,” or an inseparable association between the world and their art practice. The pictures respond to the shifting demographics of our time, befitting the artists’ proclamation of “Art for All.”Three limited edition posters will also be available for sale. For more information and to purchase advanced copies, click here

Nari Ward and the Poetry of Meaning

Nari Ward and the Poetry of Meaning

September 5, 2017

Museum Magazine spoke to Ward the day after the opening celebrations for the Socrates Park project, and two days after the launch of his fourth solo exhibition at Lehmann Maupin—a double show titled TILL, LIT. A mid-career survey is also on show at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston until 4 September, and a recent commission of his shoelace rendering of the first three words of the United States Constitution (‘WE THE PEOPLE’) is on view at the New-York Historical Society on the Upper West Side.

Performa 17 Spotlights New Experimental Cross-Boundary Works by African Artists and Writers

September 5, 2017

Johannesburg-based artist Nicholas Hlobo’s Performa 17 commission expands on an earlier performance installation, umBhovuzo: The Parable of the Sower (2016), an elegant and sensual work involving four men seated atop toweringly high chairs at equally high tables mounted with Singer sewing machines. Representing a cherished “altarpiece” of productivity and potential income in the makeshift squatter homes of apartheid-era townships, as well as the labor and repression symbolized by the American-manufactured sewing machine, the performers sew endless bolts of cotton and raw silk into long tails that pile up on the floor surrounding them. The meditative, durational piece is a striking exploration of domesticity and gender, and of the continuing effects of colonialism on the workforce of South African men and women.

Roberto Cuoghi “PERLA POLLINA, 1996–2016” at MADRE, Naples

Roberto Cuoghi “PERLA POLLINA, 1996–2016” at MADRE, Naples

Mousse Magazine

August 29, 2017

The accidental title of Roberto Cuoghi’s midcareer retrospective, which the press release attributes to “the erroneous effects of an auto-correct program,” invites various possible readings.

Eleven Must-See Art Exhibitions in the US this September

Eleven Must-See Art Exhibitions in the US this September

Artinfo

August 29, 2017

Lehmann Maupin is presenting an exhibition of recent and significant historic work by Los Angeles-based artist Mary Corse who is best known for her minimalist, monochromatic black and white paintings. Returning to the materials used in the earlier series of Black Light Paintings, Corse is showing an epic 19-foot painting as well as an additional 10 new corresponding paintings.

12 Habits of Highly Effective Artists, From Creative Exercise to Living in Airplane Mode

12 Habits of Highly Effective Artists, From Creative Exercise to Living in Airplane Mode

Artnet

August 22, 2017

What makes some artists more successful than others? Talent, luck, and hard work certainly play a part, but there are other, subtler habits that many of the greats seem to have in common. We asked 11 artists about their work routines and the way they structure their lives to see how these everyday rituals, big and small, make them tick. Below, see the 12 habits that help these artists create their best work.

Creative Time Raises Flag by Nari Ward

Creative Time Raises Flag by Nari Ward

August 21, 2017

The third flag in Creative Time’s “Pledge of Allegiance” series was raised today at the nonprofit’s headquarters on East 4th Street in Manhattan. Breathing Flag (2017), designed by artist Nari Ward, will remain up for the rest of the month, before being replaced by another artist’s flag.

Resistance Art to See in New York City

Resistance Art to See in New York City

The New Yorker

August 16, 2017

Following are The New Yorker’s recent reviews from our Goings On About Town section of current shows in New York that find artists, fashion designers, activists, and documentarians working with the conviction that resistance is its own form of beauty.

Nari Ward’s Breathing Flag Raised at Creative Time

Nari Ward’s Breathing Flag Raised at Creative Time

Whitewall

August 15, 2017

Nari Ward‘s Breathing Flag was raised at Creative Time‘s headquarters in New York.

Nari Ward Spotlights the Gap Between Poverty and Privilege

Nari Ward Spotlights the Gap Between Poverty and Privilege

Hyperallergic

August 14, 2017

The title of Nari Ward’s exhibition, TILL, LIT, at Lehmann Maupin gallery is a pun that works in several valences, each devolving from how you read the two words. Reading “till” as a noun gets you the UK version of a cash register, but you can also read it as an abbreviation of “until.” “Lit” might mean illuminated, or, in the vernacular, popping — that is, fun and amazing, or intoxicated. Is the cash drawer having light thrown on it? Or will something (as yet unnamed) persist until it’s set on fire, or is primed with alcohol and drugs?

Shasha Tittmann Joins Lehmann Maupin as Director in Hong Kong

Shasha Tittmann Joins Lehmann Maupin as Director in Hong Kong

August 8, 2017

Lehmann Maupin is pleased to announce that Shasha Tittmann has joined the gallery as a director in Hong Kong. Tittmann, who brings years of experience and is fluent in Mandarin and English, will manage the Hong Kong gallery starting in September, and focus on working with collectors and institutions in Asia. She has held positions at Tang Contemporary Art, Hong Kong and Beijing; and Opera Gallery, Hong Kong. Tittmann earned a Bachelor of Arts in art history from McGill University in Montreal, Canada.

“I am thrilled to be joining Lehmann Maupin,” says Tittmann. “I am looking forward to working with a roster of talented artists I admire, and to further growing the gallery’s relations with artists, institutions, and collectors in Asia.”
 

Nari Ward

Nari Ward

The New Yorker

August 7, 2017

In his new show, titled “Till, Lit,” the Jamaican-born, Harlem-based artist presents formally striking and politically charged sculptures made from surprising materials. The “till” of the title evokes both field labor and the reserves of a cash register. Compartments from the latter figure in a number of works here, as do delicate paper rectangles that are made from the excised edges of dollar bills. These shapes overlap in abstract compositions, such as the austere “Royal Alpha” and the shimmering “Providence Spirits (Silver),” which also incorporates cowrie shells (once valued as money). The legacy of slavery and its barbaric transactions suffuses the works on view. The powerful installation “Lit” uses buzzing floodlights and a concrete-submerged ladder to conflate antebellum slave patrolling with present-day police surveillance. The mixed-media work “Hanging Study” proposes a form of redress—it spells out the word “reparations.”

95 Horatio Street by Do Ho Suh Opens

95 Horatio Street by Do Ho Suh Opens

July 18, 2017

95 Horatio Street, the sixth in a series of installations by the Whitney, debuted yesterday across from the museum.

Alex Prager

Alex Prager

Flaunt

July 18, 2017

Alex Prager’s willingness to provide something for everyone makes her one of the most generous contemporary artists. She combines technical skill and compositional precision with the beautiful thematics of film noir or melodrama. Perhaps above all Prager uses photography and film to excavate the inner lives of individuals – some of whom we recognize, but most are anonymous faces in the crowd. Nowhere is this more potent than in Prager’s commission for Times Square’s Midnight Moment, in which her short film Applause plays every night at 11:57 PM during the month of June. A sea of people clap across the enormous electronic billboards, and one is filled with exhilaration and fear. Every time we get up in the morning and step outside, after all, we are performing for somebody – why not get the recognition we deserve? Or is there freedom in anonymity?

Artists Gilbert & George in Budapest for exhibition opening

Artists Gilbert & George in Budapest for exhibition opening

Budapest Business Journal

July 18, 2017

Scapegoating Pictures for Budapest, a major exhibition by the contemporary London artists Gilbert & George, gets its press preview and official opening on Friday, July 7, at the Ludwig Museum of Contemporary Art in Budapest.

Not to be Missed: Our Recommendations for the rest of 2017

Not to be Missed: Our Recommendations for the rest of 2017

Christie's

July 18, 2017

‘Lehmann Maupin is dedicating its autumn kick-off show to the California-based artist Mary Corse, who has been producing works associated with the Light and Space movement since the mid-1960s. She innovated a technique of mixing paint with tiny microspheres to achieve an illuminating effect, which creates an ever-changing sense of movement. I think they are absolutely captivating.’ 7 September to 7 October 2017.

Teresita Fernandez

Teresita Fernandez

4Columns

July 17, 2017

To see Teresita Fernández’s installation, Overlook, one must book a tour of Olana, the house built by the preeminent Hudson River School landscape painter Frederic Edwin Church (1826–1900) in the last half of the nineteenth century. Perched atop a rise in a 250-acre landscape with sweeping views of the Hudson River, the Arabesque confection is filled to the brim with Chinese tiles, Indian woodwork, Middle Eastern carpets, Persian ceramics, Mexican sombreros and folk art, pre-Columbian artifacts, and old master and nineteenth-century paintings, all picked up during the painter’s trips to Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East or at dealers in New York City. Only after wending your way through this decor—a sort of architectural self-portrait of Church as intrepid artist-explorer and inveterate shopper—is Fernández’s quiet, elegant, and devastatingly effective intervention visible.

Review: multimedia artist Kader Attia takes the temper of the times at MCA

Review: multimedia artist Kader Attia takes the temper of the times at MCA

Sydney Morning Herald

June 30, 2017

If ever an artist were attuned to the temper of our times it is Kader Attia (b.1970). Following a successful showing in Documenta 13 in 2012, this French-Algerian creator of multimedia installations and videos has since become one of the most sought-after artists in the world.

Three to See: New York

Three to See: New York

The Art Newspaper

June 28, 2017

The New York-based artist Nari Ward’s solo exhibition (G.O.A.T., again, until 4 September) is at the waterfront Socrates Sculpture Park in Long Island City, Queens, with beautiful views of the Manhattan skyline. The show, which includes six new works made for the site, takes its name from the acronym for Greatest of All Time and also uses imagery of goats throughout. It is a bizarre and playful assortment of sculptures, some inspired by lawn ornaments, that nevertheless alludes to issues such as race politics. Works include a giant copper bell that looks like a billy goat’s testicles, cast concrete goats piled with things like fire hoses and even a 40 ft. long hobbyhorse—or, rather, hobbygoat—lying on the lawn.

Summer Hours beginning July 5

Summer Hours beginning July 5

June 27, 2017

Lehmann Maupin's New York galleries will be closed from Saturday, July 1–Tuesday, July 4. We will reopen on Wednesday, July 5 with summer hours, Monday–Friday, 10 AM–6 PM, through September 5. Our Hong Kong gallery will remain open with regular hours, Tuesday–Friday, 10 AM–7 PM; Saturday, 11 AM-7 PM. 

Shifts In Aspiration

Shifts In Aspiration

Surface Magazine

June 19, 2017

The glass beads that American artist Liza Lou has worked with since the 1990s have been deployed in incredible feats of personal discipline and attention to de­tail. Works such as Kitchen (1991-1996) rendered the room to scale and took the artist five years-working alone-to create. But the past decade has seen Lou's priorities shift beyond the seemingly contradictory aspirations of scale and minutiae to use her practice to support social change.

At Venice Biennale, Erwin Wurm Makes Sculpture ‘a Form of Action’

At Venice Biennale, Erwin Wurm Makes Sculpture ‘a Form of Action’

The New York Times

June 18, 2017

For the next five months, an orange freight truck will be standing on its head outside the Austrian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale. Visitors are invited to go up the stairs to a small enclosure at the top, where labels on all sides read: “Stand quiet and look out over the Mediterranean Sea.”

"On the Horizon" at PAMM

"On the Horizon" at PAMM

June 14, 2017

As the full moonlight danced in the water at Perez Art Museum Miami (PAMM), I considered the incredible night of art talks, laughs, great Latin music, and people I was blessed to experience. It still all feels surreal to have been present at an event that honors art and artists among insightful minds, that actually get the importance art has for society overall. The celebration and opening of “On the Horizon: Contemporary Cuban Art from the Jorge M. Perez Collection”at PAMM was a one of kind experience.

Ashley Bickerton: Direct, enigmatic, and in constant pursuit of profitable alienation

Ashley Bickerton: Direct, enigmatic, and in constant pursuit of profitable alienation

ArtReview

June 13, 2017

Boom! That’s how Ornamental Hysteria, Ashley Bickerton’s current exhibition at Damien Hirst’s Newport Street Gallery, opens – with  a box sporting an ominous red LED number-counter bolted to the wall.

Algerian-French artist Kader Attia’s work on show at Sydney’s MCA

The Australian

June 10, 2017

Algeria occupies an important place in the French mind, but its history and culture, despite its famous sons Camus and Derrida, remain fairly obscure to most of the English-speaking world. It is not nearly as well known as its western neighbour Morocco, or even Tunisia to the east, because it never developed a comparable tourist business or indeed allure. Also, for the past few decades civil war (1991-2002) and problems with Islamic militants — which began before the world in general had any idea of the scale of the menace — have made it unsafe for travellers to visit.

Why Erwin Wurm is the Most Stylish Artist of 2017

Why Erwin Wurm is the Most Stylish Artist of 2017

Mr. Porter

June 7, 2017

For the past 20 years, the Austrian artist Mr Erwin Wurm has been creating what he calls “One Minute Sculptures” – temporary artworks created by members of the public by following a series of instructions within a gallery setting, using everyday objects that they find to hand. (“Sit on the pedestal… and think of Manzoni”; “Put the pedestal on your toes and be submissive for one minute”). This practice grew out of economic necessity. In the late 1980s, Mr Wurm worked with whatever materials he could find and, seeing as his studio was next to a secondhand clothes shop, developed a fascination with clothing: how it could be worn, stretched, folded and deformed; how it could be manipulated, according to a set of instructions. Combining this interest in everyday materials with a questioning of boundaries of sculpture, influenced by the likes of Mr Marcel Duchamp, Mr Joseph Beuys and Ms Marina Abramović, Mr Wurm hit upon the idea of “One Minute Sculptures” in 1997, and has continually returned to the format in the ensuing years, despite his initial doubts. “At the time I really doubted it and thought it was all nothing,” he tells super-curator Mr Hans-Ulrich Obrist in new book Erwin Wurm: One Minute Sculptures 1997–2017. “No one would like it, and no one would find it interesting.”

9 Artists to Watch in June

9 Artists to Watch in June

Artspace

June 7, 2017

Currently on view at ICA Boston is the largest survey of the work of Nari Ward, a Jamaican-born artist who came up in New York City in the 1990s. Ward’s experimental use of found objects like shopping carts, soda, shoelaces, and fire escapes point to social and political issues like poverty, race, and consumer culture. A mix of debris and treasure, his pieces ask us to question how we’ve come to value the objects that surround us. To call Ward a rising star wouldn't be accurate—he was included in the 2006 Whitney Biennial, Documenta XI, the New Museum, Walker Art Center, and the MCA Detroit—but this exhibition is the most comprehensive survey to date.

Teresita Fernández: Fire (America)

Teresita Fernández: Fire (America)

The Brooklyn Rail

May 19, 2017

Fire portends calamity. It carries at its core the mission to obliterate all that is in its way. It is inherently destructive and regenerative, making it ultimately an oxymoron. Poets and novelists have sung the praises of fire as an annihilating force that fuels passionate, romantic love—one that symbolizes a rebirth of sorts. In Greek mythology, Hephaestus, the god of fire, married Aphrodite, the goddess of love. To a pyromaniac, watching a fire they have set is said to be akin to sexual release. For Native Americans, fire is quintessential for cleansing the earth in order to grow new crops; it is through the marriage of earth and fire that life is created.

Venice Biennale: Whose Reflection Do You See?

Venice Biennale: Whose Reflection Do You See?

May 19, 2017

Timing isn’t everything, but it’s a lot. If the bland, soft-power 2017 Venice Biennale, called “Viva Arte Viva,” had arrived two, or four, or six years ago, it might have passed muster, even made sense. But coming post-Brexit and post-Trump, it feels almost perversely out of sync with the political moment, and nowhere near strong enough to define a moment of its own.

Social Alchemist Nari Ward on Using Art to Rethink the Difference Between Money and Spirituality

Social Alchemist Nari Ward on Using Art to Rethink the Difference Between Money and Spirituality

Artnet

May 18, 2017

Nari Ward has been having a hell of a year. The Jamaican-born artist just celebrated his first New York institutional solo show Nari Ward: G.O.A.T., again,a new series of outdoor sculptures at the Socrates Sculpture Park in Queens; installed a recent commission of his project We The People (2011) at the New York Historical Society on the Upper West Side; and sees his travelling survey, Nari Ward: Sun Splashed, move to the ICA in Boston, on view through September 4, 2017.

All that alone would be enough to keep the man busy, but lo and behold, the restless Ward has an upcoming solo exhibition at Lehmann Maupin opening next month, his fourth with the gallery. “TILL, LIT” will present new works by the artist, from sculpture to installation to mixed media on canvas.

Recently, artnet News went to visit Ward at his studio in Harlem to discuss this new body of work, his place in his community, and the material and spiritual transformations of his found objects.


Lehmann Maupin open Sunday, May 7th

Lehmann Maupin open Sunday, May 7th

May 7, 2017


On the occasion of Frieze New York 2017, Lehmann Maupin's Lower East Side location at 201 Chrystie Street will be open to the public this Sunday, May 7 from 11 AM-6 PM. Be sure to stop by the gallery to view Teresita Fernández's exhibition Fire (America), open through May 20, 2017.

 

Artist Walkthrough & Brunch: Teresita Fernández

Artist Walkthrough & Brunch: Teresita Fernández

May 5, 2017

Best known for her immersive installations and public projects that explore the various historical and psychological implications of the genre of landscape, Teresita Fernández’s most recent exhibition at Lehmann Maupin, Fire (America), debuts a 16-foot glazed ceramic wall panel depicting a nocturnal landscape engulfed in flames, as well as a new series of abstract landscapes made from burned paper. Fernández has also created an immersive, 100-foot panoramic drawing on site comprised of built-up, dimensional layers of solid charcoal applied directly to the gallery’s walls.

On the occasion of Frieze Week, the gallery will host a brunch as part of the Lower East Side Morning on Friday, May 5 from 10 AM to 12 PM. Fernández will give a walkthrough of her exhibition at 11AM.

Poetry Reading Hosted by Teresita Fernández

Poetry Reading Hosted by Teresita Fernández

April 29, 2017

On Saturday, April 29th, 2 PM, Lehmann Maupin will host a reading featuring six poets whose work speaks to (or about) American identity and a sense of place: George Abraham, Safia Ehillo, Sonia Guinansaca, Jive Poetic, and Paul Tran. The poets will activate Teresita Fernandez's most recent glazed ceramic work from her Fire (America) series and an immersive, site-specific charcoal wall drawing, Charred Landscape (America). The series utilizes fire as a metaphor for violence in America and draws attention to the sophisticated technique of slash and burn used by indigenous people to shape and cultivate the land. This is contrary to the false colonial narrative that depicts the pre-colonized America as an untamed wilderness. Fernández's work offers a historical revision through the depiction of the landscape as a way to visualize erased, warped, and invisible narratives that are often omitted or obscured in our perception of what is America and who is American.

Do Ho Suh awarded Ho-Am Prize for the Arts

Do Ho Suh awarded Ho-Am Prize for the Arts

Lehmann Maupin is pleased to share that Do Ho Suh is the recipient of the Ho-Am Prize for The Arts. Established in 1990, the Prize is presented each year to individuals who have contributed to academics, the arts, and social development, or who have furthered the welfare of humanity through distinguished accomplishments in their respective professional fields. The Prize for The Arts encompasses broad areas of arts activities including literature, music, painting, design, dance, and theater. The Prize is awarded to people of Korean heritage who have contributed to the enrichment of culture and arts for humankind. Do Ho Suh is a world-renowned contemporary artist showcasing works that explore the universality of the world while appreciating aesthetic aspects unique to Korea in the form of sculpture, visual and installation arts, and other diverse media.

Robin Rhode: Painting in black and white, but only in art

Robin Rhode: Painting in black and white, but only in art

Deutsche Walls

April 5, 2017

From a whisper to a scream

Lehmann Maupin, 201 Chrystie Street, New York

March 31, 2017

From May 25—August 25, 2017, Lehmann Maupin will present From a whisper to a scream, a group exhibition that examines the ways artists utilize the seemingly minimal application of form, color, and line to create work infused with social, political, and cultural meaning. The artists in this exhibition all draw from the visual vocabulary of Minimalism of the 1960s in their deliberate restriction of form and exploration of physical space, but do so as a method to expose historical inaccuracies and prejudice about religion, identity, and place. Through painting, sculpture, and video, these artists transform a typically self-referential genre into one that speaks as loudly as narrative imagery.

MMCA-TATE International Symposium

MMCA-TATE International Symposium

Lee Bul: Keynote Speaker

March 29, 2017

Lee Bul will participate as keynote speaker at Territories Disrupted: Asian Art after 1989, an international symposium co-organized by the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Korea (MMCA) and Tate Research Center: Asia. The symposium will consist of lectures and discussions placing the historical fall of the Berlin wall in a single line with the dynamic movements, exchange, and mutual organic influences that appeared in the contemporary art of the Northeast and Southeast Asia. The conference, moderated by Tate Senior Research Curator Sook-Kyung Lee, is open to the public, however advance registration is required. For more information and to register, click below.

*Due to technical difficulties, please do not open with Google Chrome.

Fionna Flaherty appointed Director

Fionna Flaherty appointed Director

March 29, 2017

Fionna Flaherty joined Lehmann Maupin in 2011. She previously worked as a Sales Associate and Associate Director at the gallery before being named Director in 2017. Flaherty works closely with photographers Catherine Opie and Alex Prager as their Artist Liaison. Prior to Lehmann Maupin, she spent two years at Spanierman Gallery. Flaherty received her BA from Bates College in Art And Visual Culture Criticism and History.

Billy Childish is far from stuck

Billy Childish is far from stuck

The Telegraph

March 7, 2017

Tracey Emin once accused her former boyfriend, artist Billy Childish, of being "stuck, stuck, stuck" with figurative painting; hence the "stuckism" movement. But out in New York last week, Childish’s art was far from stuck, and sold, sold, sold at the Art Dealers Association of America fair through his dealer, Lehmann Maupin.

Fifteen paintings sold for prices between €25,000 to €45,000 to buyers from Turkey, China, Hong Kong, Korea, and the United States, where one was acquired by a trustee of the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Ten to see: New York

Ten to see: New York

ArtReview

March 4, 2017

For those of us art workers who might wish to obscure our less-than-glamorous nine-to-fives, Kader Attia’s installation at Lehmann Maupin, Reason’s Oxymorons, creates a familiar dystopia. There’s a sea of cubicles, sure, but this corporate grey environment, with eighteen sets of desks, monitors, office chairs, and headphones cedes to deeper content, especially for those of us who yearn for sophisticated research-based practices. Attia offers us a video library of eighteen interviews conducted with psychiatrists, patients, and philosophers, who together make clear the trauma of colonialism and western hegemony on the personal and cultural psyche, as well as the ongoing path to wellbeing.

Teresita Fernandez wants to change the way you think about American landscapes

Teresita Fernandez wants to change the way you think about American landscapes

The Art Newspaper

March 4, 2017

The New Yorker

Goings on About Town

March 4, 2017

The French-Algerian artist, who lives in Paris and Berlin, presents a labyrinth of office cubicles in the now terribly pertinent installation “Reason’s Oxymorons,” from 2015. Each compact unit is outfitted with a desk, a chair, and one of eighteen video works, for which the artist interviewed African and European researchers, theorists, and clinicians about mental health and healing in the context of neocolonialism, civil war, and mass displacement. (A floor plan identifies broad topics, such as “Exile,” “Genocide,” “Language,” and “The Magical Sciences.”) Attia’s cross-cultural experts are, by turns, enlightening and inscrutable, delivering both heartbreaking information and cold analysis about their refugee patients or ethnographic studies. Watching them while seated at a nondescript desk, you become a kind of case worker yourself, tasked with assimilating the acute emotional consequences of our cresting geopolitical crises.

Ashley Bickerton gets retrospective break from Damien Hirst

Ashley Bickerton gets retrospective break from Damien Hirst

The Art Newspaper

March 4, 2017

Ashley Bickerton is to get his first major retrospective in the UK thanks to his friend and long-time collector Damien Hirst. The show of work by the Bali-based US artist, which is due to open in April at Hirst’s Newport Street Gallery in south London, follows numerous disappointments with other institutions. Bickerton tells us that five planned museum retrospectives have fallen through. “I am too eccentric; I didn’t pass muster with the boards,” he says. “The beautiful thing about Newport Street Gallery is that there’s only one person on the board.”

Catherine Opie, All-American Subversive

Catherine Opie, All-American Subversive

The New Yorker

February 28, 2017

Her photographs range from the marginal to the mainstream, capturing things that are invisible to the rest of us.

Kader Attia

Kader Attia

The New York Times

February 28, 2017

The title piece of this tremendously absorbing show, “Reason’s Oxymorons,” is an installation of 18 video monitors in semiprivate cubicles. Furnished in black-and-gray corporate chic, the cubicles run the length of the gallery in three rows, and each monitor plays a separate group of thematically organized snippets from nearly 30 interviews Mr. Attia conducted with doctors, academics and healers, from Paris to Dakar.

Dallas Art Fair’s 2017 Lineup Signals Fair’s Art Scene Creds

Dallas Art Fair’s 2017 Lineup Signals Fair’s Art Scene Creds

Artinfo

February 11, 2017

Dallas in Texas is better known as a key location for collectible car auctions than it is for anything related to arts and culture. But that might be about to change as the city’s burgeoning art scene continues to grow and develop, further cementing and establishing Dallas as one of the most vibrant and potentially influential centres for art in the entire United States.

Do Ho Suh: 500 Words

Do Ho Suh: 500 Words

Artforum

January 28, 2017

Do Ho Suh is an artist based between London, New York, and Seoul who is known for his intensive work with architecture’s experiential, mnemonic, and psychological dimensions, engagements that often take the form of full-scale fabric re-creations of the spaces in which he has lived. Here, he discusses rubbing/loving, 2016, a large-scale piece that began with a painstaking process of wrapping all of the surfaces of his former apartment with white paper—including walls and cabinets, light switches and door handles, as well as his house key in its lock. Suh then used colored pencils and pastels to create rubbings on the sheets, in a process that discloses and memorializes all of the home’s details. After documenting the entire process, Suh vacated the apartment and has placed all the paper fragments in storage while he explores the possibility of exhibiting the reassembled work.

​Beading Off: Artist Liza Lou Talks New Show at Lehmann Maupin

​Beading Off: Artist Liza Lou Talks New Show at Lehmann Maupin

#legend

January 28, 2017

American artist Liza Lou, born in 1969, divides her time between Los Angeles and KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa. She is currently in Hong Kong promoting her first solo exhibition, ingxube, a series of six new works at Lehmann Maupin (until March 17). Lou’s relationship with South Africa - she established a studio of Zulu artisans in 2005 - has enabled her to develop her signature medium of glass beads by collectively producing intricate beaded canvases, sculptures and large-scale installations. Her work has shown in the world’s most prestigious galleries. The works at Lehmann are entirely comprised of wooden beads, which from distance, look more like paintings. #legend met Lou and shared a lively, informative chat.

Why Artist Kader Attia Is Having an Art World Moment

Why Artist Kader Attia Is Having an Art World Moment

Artnet

January 28, 2017

According to the dictionary an oxymoron is a figure of speech in which seemingly contradictory terms are syntactically conjoined, like the words “alternative” and “facts,” often to ridiculous effect. The French-Algerian artist Kader Attia, has explored similarly strange juxtapositions in his latest multimedia exhibition at Lehmann Maupin, a gallery on the Lower East Side. In a video installation titled Reason’s Oxymorons, Attia presents eighteen interviews with a number of remarkably erudite men and women. Their insights, incongruously, are found inside a maze of soul-sucking cubicles.

SEARCH LOG IN SETTINGS ART & DESIGN  Installation at Socrates Sculpture Park Takes Political Turn

SEARCH LOG IN SETTINGS ART & DESIGN Installation at Socrates Sculpture Park Takes Political Turn

The New York Times

January 27, 2017

Do Ho Suh at Madison Museum of Contemporary Art

Do Ho Suh at Madison Museum of Contemporary Art

Artinfo

January 26, 2017

Madison Museum of Contemporary Art presents an exhibition of works by South Korean artist Do Ho Suh (born. 1962) that will run from February 11 through May 14, 2017.

The selection of works on display is a multi-part installation that comprises large-scale architectural structures, documentary films, illuminated sculptures, and works on paper. The highlight of the show is a full-scale replica of Suh’s New York City apartment and studio created from translucent colored fabric. The artist is renowned for his meticulous, mesmerizing sculptures and installations that relate to his personal experiences living in both Eastern and Western cultures. Suh re-imagines and reconstructs his various homes and creates works of art that highlight the permeable boundary between public and private space.

Here’s Who’s Showing at Art Basel Hong Kong’s Debut Kabinett Sector

New York Observer

January 26, 2017

The Kabinett sector, which brings mini curated shows to Art Basel Miami Beach each December, expands to the Hong Kong fair this year, representatives for Art Basel said today.

Exclusive: Art Basel in Hong Kong’s First Kabinett Sector

Artinfo

January 26, 2017

Art Basel has announced the projects for the first Hong Kong edition of its popular Kabinett sector which offers galleries the opportunity to present carefully curated exhibitions within the booths. The Hong Kong debut of the Kabinett sector at Art Basel in Hong Kong 2017 will feature 19 projects from Asia, Europe, and the United States.

Lee Bul at Lehmann Maupin, New York

Lee Bul at Lehmann Maupin, New York

Artinfo

January 25, 2017

Lehmann Maupin, New York, is hosting an exhibition, by Lee Bul, on view till February 11, 2017.

Lee Bul is considered to be one of the leading Korean artists of her generation. For her fifth exhibition with the gallery, Lee Bul is showcasing a series of recent mixed media works and immersive installations. Though varied in media and content, these works are united in their exploration of structural systems—from the individual body to larger architectural frameworks that encompass cities and utopian societies—which have become a hallmark of Lee Bul’s oeuvre.

Lee Bul was born in 1964, lives and works in Seoul. She received a BFA in sculpture from Hongik University, Seoul, in 1987.

The exhibition is on view at 536 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011.

Backstory: Strange Bedfellows

Backstory: Strange Bedfellows

Art in America

January 25, 2017

Eleven years ago, I extended my Los Angeles art practice to Durban, South Africa where I established a studio and began commissioning beadwork from Zulu women in KwaZulu-Natal. This photo was taken around 2007. I’m in Nyuswa, a rural area, visiting Cebisile Mbhele, who is seated on the bed beside me. We were working on a sculpture called Book of Days, which was comprised of 365 woven sheets of silver-lined glass beads, which were to be each stacked one on top of another like pages in a manuscript.

Contradictory Truths: Kader Attia's Video Dialogues at Lehmann Maupin

Contradictory Truths: Kader Attia's Video Dialogues at Lehmann Maupin

Artinfo

January 18, 2017

French-Algerian artist Kader Attia appears to be everywhere at once in 2017. Lehmann Maupin recently unveiled his second solo exhibition with the gallery, featuring the large-scale video installation Reason’s Oxymorons, which is set up like some kind of cross between a soulless cubicle office and a human-sized maze where one can encounter Attia’s collection of interviews with philosophers, ethnologists, historians, psychiatrists, musicologists, and healers on topics as wide ranging as exile and magical science. The winner of last year’s Prix Marcel Duchamp, his work is on view in the finalist's exhibition at the Centre Pompidou through January 30. He also curated the first of the Sharjah Biennial’s four offsite projects, which took place on January 8 and 9 in Dakar, Senegal in advance of the Biennial’s opening on March 10. On January 21 the Block Museum of Art at Northwestern University will open an exhibition of newly commissioned work based in part on his research in the school’s Herskovits Library of African Studies; and a major survey of his work will open at the Musuem of Contemporary Art Australia in April. He spoke with Artinfo about the perennial point of investigation in his work — the notion of how repair can take place after a large-scale societal injury — and how this drives the projects on view throughout this year in these various far-flung corners of the globe.

Must See: Kader Attia, Reason's Oxymorons

Artforum

January 18, 2017

Kader Attia is a poet, critic, anthropologist, and unrepentant fabulist. For the artist’s second solo exhibition at Lehmann Maupin, he brings us Reason’s Oxymorons, 2015, a multichannel video installation—which made its debut at the Thirteenth Biennale de Lyon—that features “European and African ethnographers, psychiatric and philosophical practitioners, and theorists discussing topics grouped under titles including ‘Genocide,’ ‘Totem and Fetish,’ ‘Reason and Politics,’ and ‘Trance.’”

Great Lengths: A Glass Artist’s Formidable Process

Great Lengths: A Glass Artist’s Formidable Process

Artinfo

January 17, 2017

More than a thousand pounds of glass beads arrived recently to Liza Lou’s doorstep in Durban, South Africa. The New York-born artist, who has one of the most painstaking practices on the planet, was thrilled when she opened the package: “The colors were amazing!” she says of the tiny, .4 inch beads, which were crafted in Hiroshima, Japan. “Each bag was filled with saturated color: silvers and reds, coppers, pinks.” She laid the bags out across the floor and spent the next several days arranging them into various color combinations before pouring her final selections into a vat, the bands of colors blending like pigments in paint.

Cutting-edge Korean art in New York

Cutting-edge Korean art in New York

Financial Times

January 11, 2017

Korean art has made a global mark in recent years, appearing at galleries, art fairs and auction houses across the world. Now New York’s Lehmann Maupin gallery – which has been on the scene from the get-go – presents a must-see show of new work by notable artist Lee Bul from January 12 to February 11.

Kader Attia’s Water-Themed Sharjah Biennial Project in Dakar

Kader Attia’s Water-Themed Sharjah Biennial Project in Dakar

Artinfo

January 7, 2017

Paris-born French-Algerian artist Kader Attia is presenting the first of the four Sharjah Biennial 13 (SB13) off-site projects at the Université Cheikh Anta Diop in Dakar, Senegal on January 8 and 9. Titled “Vive l’Indépendance de l’Eau” [Long Live the Independence of Water], the project consists of a program of workshops, symposiums, and performances based around the keyword “water.”

Nicholas Hlobo wins first VILLA Extraordinary Award for Sculpture

Nicholas Hlobo wins first VILLA Extraordinary Award for Sculpture

September 28, 2016

The Claire & Edoardo Villa Will Trust has honored Nicholas Hlobo as the inaugural recipient of the VILLA Extraordinary Award for Sculpture. This generous award acknowledges exceptional achievement in the field of sculpture by a South African artist and empowers the continuing practice of the recipient through an agreed program. The Claire and Edoardo Villa Will Trust fulfills the artist’s legacy to perpetuate and enhance his name and reputation and to support deserving South African artists.

Liu Wei

Liu Wei

"Artist of the Year," 10th Award of Art China

May 20, 2016

The awards ceremony for the 10th Award of Art China was held in Jianfu Palace in Beijing’s Forbidden City on May 16, 2016. The AAC, now in its tenth year, and two years into major reforms, carried out this year’s selection according to the theme of “The Contemporary in History,” seeking out the unique logic and value of contemporary art in the confluence of history and the
contemporary, global and Chinese, inside and outside, in hopes of rediscovering the
contemporary within a historical vision.

Mickalene Thomas

Mickalene Thomas

Receives 2015 United States Artist Fellowship Award

November 10, 2015

Lehmann Maupin is pleased to share that Mickalene Thomas has been awarded the 2015 United States Artists Fellowship Grant

10th Gwangju Biennial

10th Gwangju Biennial

Lee Bul wins the Noon Award

September 5, 2014

Lehmann Maupin congratulates Lee Bul on winning the Noon Award at the 2014 Gwangju Biennale. The award is given to an established artist who has produced the most experimental and creative work that embodies the theme of this year's biennale.

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